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Latest Version RESOURCES FOR HELLENIC GENEALOGY RESEARCH

Latest Version RESOURCES FOR HELLENIC GENEALOGY RESEARCHBy Georgia Stryker Keilman HellenicGenealogyGeek.com  
CLICK HERE TO ACCESS FILE


TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Adoption/Orphans 

Asia Minor / Pontos / Anatolia / Ottoman Empire / Turkey 

Cemetery/Funerals/Obituaries 

Culture 

Diaspora (- General, Africa, Albania, Argentina, Asia, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Caribbean, Chile, Columbia, Cyprus, Egypt, England plus Ireland Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Iran, Italy, Jordan, Mexico, Peru, Philippines, Russia/USSR, Serbia, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, United States 

DNA 
Election Material – Translations of General Election Lists (Greek to English)
Family Trees / Hellenic Genealogy Research 

Film & Video 

Greece 

Greek Language / Handwriting 

Greek Names  

Greek Orthodox Church 

Hellenic Organizations 

Immigration 

Jewish 

Libraries 

Maps 

The Greek Pioneers of Confection in America

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THE PIONEERS OF CONFECTION IN AMERICA
By Steve Frangos

Published in The National Herald, February 21, 2004
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I am excited that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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Few Greeks today realize that from the early 1870s until just after World War II, their compatriots held a commanding presence in the American confectionary industry, dishing up tons of sinfully sweet treats from behind the counters of their candy stores and ice cream parlors.In fact, the Greeks’ early presence in this trade can be documented from a wide variety of sources.
As Theodore Saloutos relates in his book, “The Greeks in the United States,” the pioneer confectioners were Eleutherios Pelalas of Sparta and Panagiotis Hatzideris of Smyrna, who established a lukum (sweet) shop shortly after their arrival in 1869.This partnership was terminated within a brief time:in 1877 Pelalas ass…

Greek Villages are Vanishing

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GREEK VILLAGES ARE VANISHING

by Alekos Lidorikis. published by ekathimerini.com on October 20, 2017

"Vassilis was born in Aghios Ioannis and is one of about 10 permanent residents who remain in the village. Aghios Ioannis is part of the Thermo municipality, in the Aitoloakarnania region of western Greece. The municipality has a total population of 9,299. Aghios Ioannis is 15 kilometers from Thermo, the area’s main town. Vassilis lived in Aghios Ioannis until the age of 20, when he left for Athens to find work. Four decades later, he has retired and returned to the place where he grew up.

At an elevation of 1,000 meters, Aghios Ioannis is set in an idyllic mountain landscape. Vassilis gets emotional when talking about his youth. “In the 1960s, when I was in first grade, the village school had more than 70 students. Among those, nine were my siblings. All the families in the village back then were big. The school was right across the street from my home. After school we would all help…

Greeks in World War I Service Card for Resident Floridians Collection

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The Florida Memory State Library & Archives of Florida (www.floridamemory.com) has a collection of World War I Service Cards available online.

There are 80 cards in this collection for people listing Greece as their place of birth.  The following link will lead you to those results -
https://www.floridamemory.com/solr-search/results/?q=%28greece%20OR%20tt%3Agreece%5E10%29%20AND%20collection:%22World%20War%20I%20Service%20Cards%22&searchbox=9&gallery=&compact=0&query=greece&pc=&cid=&county=

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SERIES DESCRIPTION

Series Description - World War I Army Card Roster, 1924 Series Number: S 1204 Creator: Florida. Military Dept. Title: World War I Army Card Roster, 1924 Quantity: 8.00 cubic ft. 11.00 microfilm reel 16 mm. Arrangement: Original records are alphabetical by surname; microfilm copy is alphabetical by county, then by surname. Description: This series consists of a card roster of Floridians who served in the United States Army during World W…

The Greek Canadian History Project (GCHP)

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GREEK CANADIAN HISTORY PROJECT - http://archives.library.yorku.ca/gchp/

ABOUT THE PROJECT

The Greek Canadian History Project (GCHP) is an initiative designed and committed to identifying, acquiring, digitizing, preserving, and providing access to primary source materials that reflect the experiences of Canada’s Greek immigrants and their descendants. The collected sources, currently in the hands of private individuals and organizations in the Greek-Canadian community, will be placed in the care of the Clara Thomas Archives & Special Collections of York University Libraries. The Project’s stewards are Dr. Athanasios (Sakis) Gekas, HHF Chair in Modern Greek History at York University, and Christopher Grafos, Ph.D. in History, York University. The GCHP plans to be a continued repository for information, accessible for current and future research in broad thematic fields such as social, cultural, and economic practices of Greeks in Canada. We invite individuals to contribute collections …

Greek Orthodox Orphanage (Prinkipo Greek Orthodox orphanage) Europe's largest wooden building, awaits salvation off Istanbul

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GREEK ORTHODOX ORPHANAGE, EUROPE'S LARGEST WOODEN BUILDING, AWAITS SALVATION OFF ISTANBUL
ISTANBUL - Agence France-Presse - May 28, 2018
Looking up at the giant wooden edifice looming over him, Erol Baytaş shakes his head. “I don’t think it will survive another winter,” he says, broken tiles and boards strewn at his feet.
Built at the end of the 19th century on an island off Istanbul, this unique six-storey structure once served as a home for Greek Orthodox orphans until it was shut down in the early 1960s.
And more than five decades later, the now dilapidated Prinkipo Greek Orthodox orphanage is at risk of collapse......
Situated atop a hill on Büyükada, one of the Princes’ Islands in the Sea of Marmara, it is about 90 minutes by ferry from central Istanbul.
Originally conceived as a luxury casino hotel, the building was commissioned by the Compagnie des Wagons-Lits, the travel firm which historically operated the Orient Express.
The aim was to attract well-heeled European travellers wh…

GOC Church History - Archbishop Meletios Metaxakis Visits America in 1918

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ARCHBISHOP MELETIOS METAXAKIS VISITS AMERICA IN 1918
Article authored by William H. Samonides, Pd.D. and published in the Orthodox Observer July-August 2018 issue, page 21.
"August 2018 marks the centennial of a landmark event in the history of the Greek Orthodox Church in America. On Aug. 22, 1918, Archbishop Meletios Metaxakis, the metropolitan of Athens and president of the Holy Synod of the Church in Greece, arrived in New York City.
This was not the first visit by a hierarch of the Greek Orthodox Church to the Western Hemisphere. That distinction belongs to Dionysios Latas, Archbishop of Zante, who visited for six months in 1893, participating as the envoy of King George in the Parliament of the World’s Religions at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. 
Archbishop Meletios stayed only 81 days – from Aug. 22 to Nov. 10 – but his mission led to the establishment of a permanent hierarchical presence in America. 
By 1918, our Church was well established in this country. There were ab…

Greek Tobacco Moguls in North America - Part Three

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GREEK TOBACCO MOGULS IN AMERICA Part 3
By Steve Frangos

Published in The National Herald, June 26, 2004
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I am excited that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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The meteoric rise of the Greek Cigarette makers in the United States from the 1870s to the 1920s is often treated as a freakish economic boom for a small number of individuals with little long-term consequences for Greek American history.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  In terms of strictly commercial history, these Greek tobacconists employed literally hundreds of their fellow countrymen here in North America.  Diaspora Greeks from not only North America but the Balkans, Asia Minor, North Africa, England, and elsewhere were also employed in this trade, and very often by the same companies.  Finally, and perhaps most importantly, the blurring of classical Greek images with those …