Tuesday, June 14, 2016

11 born in Greece - Arizona County Coroner and Death Records 1881-1971




Ancestry.com
 has a new database titled  ARIZONA, COUNTY CORONER AND DEATH RECORDS, 1881-1971 - it includes 11 records for people born in Greece.

I have included a list of the names below, along with a description of the database.

If you do not have a subscription to Ancestry.com, remember that you can access the program at most of your local libraries for FREE.

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James Coules, born abt 1886, died 1935

Geo. K.Dillos, born abt 1863, died 1922

Charlie Hackett, born abt 1857, died 1948

Tom Kopulus, born abt 1885, died 1942

John Kotigas, born abt 1886, died 1946

Steve D. Laluntes, born abt 1896, died 1924

Peter Paffas, born abt 1885, died 1928

Chris Papagean, born abt 1889, died 1926

Peter Sokelarris, born abt 1866, died 1923

C. C. Tocumtas, born abt 1889, died 1935

Fotine Xalis, born abt 1890, died 1926

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Description of Database from Ancestry.com

Source Information:
County Coroner Records. Arizona History and Archives Division, Phoenix, Arizona.
County Death Records. Arizona History and Archives Division, Phoenix, Arizona.

Description:
This collection includes a variety of death and coroner's records from counties in Arizona. Details will vary depending on the type of record, but can include the following:
  • date of death
  • place of death
  • age at the time of death
  • cause of death
  • occupation
  • dates and locations of obituaries
  • date and place of birth
  • location of interment
  • marital status
  • parents’ names and birthplaces


Monday, June 13, 2016

The Cassimus House in Alabama: Monument of Greek-American Immigration

The Cassimus House in Montgomery, AL is a testament to the history of Hellenes in that Southern U.S. City, and to Greek-American immigration overall.


THE CASSIMUS HOUSE IN AL:
MONUMENT OF GREEK-AMERICAN IMMIGRATION

Published in The National Herald, June 4-10, 2016 Issue
Authored by Steve Frangos, TNH Staff Writer

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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 



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CHICAGO- All across the United States one can find historical monuments, statues, public buildings, pools, athletic fields, gardens, fountains, rooms, homes, plaques, public artwork, public parks, historical markers, and other commemorative sites specifically dedicated to the memories of local Greek-Americans.

The Cassimus House of Montgomery AL is yet another of these preserved historical sites. Situated on less than one acre of land this two-story frame house is a historic Queen Anne style structure which was completed in 1893. The Cassimus House is distinctive for its classical Greek revival style.

It was erected by Speridon Cassimus, the younger of two Greek brothers who, with their father, moved to Montgomery sometime around 1878, the first documented Greek immigrants to settle in that city. Curiously, historical information about the Cassimus family is sketchy at best. Initially, the family ran a wholesale fruit business on Bibb Street.

Sometime in 1935, the house was altered converting it into two individual apartments with the addition of a modern rear entrance. It is the last residential structure remaining on Jackson Street. On August 13, 1976, the House was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The House underwent extensive restoration in 1976, and ever since has been occupied by the Alabama State Employees Association. The obelisk on its right is a war memorial erected by the American Legion to honor “Alabama Veterans of all wars.”

A Nomination Form for the National Register of Historic Places that must be submitted to the Department of the Interior for every location. The Nomination Form for the House can be readily found on the Internet. There is a page provided in all such application forms for a short account of the significance of the structure being considered for inclusion. One would think such accounts are objective historic vignettes. Here is the first paragraph of the “Statement of Significance:”

“The Cassimus House is one of the few remaining examples of eccentric late Victorian architecture in Montgomery. Constructed in what was one of the finer residential areas in late 19th century Montgomery, the house not only reflects the newly–acquired prosperity of its Greek immigrant builder, but is one of the earliest landmarks associated with the Greek community in Alabama. When Speridon Cassimus built his home at 110 Jackson Street in 1893, he was a newly successful businessman and he wanted his neighbors to know it. Yet there is a curious reticence about the overall design of his house since, except for the front porch he rejected ornate, Gothic-inspired detailing for the dentil molding and egg-and-dart associated with the more classical styles of architecture.”

First, how does the unidentified writer know Cassimus built his house expressly because he “wanted his neighbors to know it?” Also, and I am making this observation as an person who has worked as a professional carpenter, I never learned to nail or add any trim to a building knowing that by doing so would make that structure either “curious” or “reticent.” It could just be that Cassimus didn’t like the kind of Gothic-inspired molding this writer seems so enamored with.

This nomination statement does have important historic information:

“Speridon Cassimus came to the United States on December 28, 1888. Funds for his trip were provided by money saved by his father and brother both named Alexander M. Cassimus. Alexander and his oldest son had arrived in Mobile, Alabama on October 23, 1873, where they opened a fruit store. After about a year, for unknown reasons, they moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where they lived until 1878 when they moved to Montgomery.

“Speridon Cassimus, a married man with two children, left his native home of Othonior, Corfu, and his family with the promise that once enough money was earned, he would return to bring them to America. From the profits of the successful wholesale fruit business which he operated on Bibb Street he accomplished this goal in 1892 and was successful enough to have purchased the lot and begun construction of the home. When he returned from Greece with his family, he brought with him fig trees, flowering Sparta bushes and many other garden variety plumb to use around the home.”

The last paragraph of this statement notes that Alex Cassimus was “one of the first Greek immigrants in the state.” And given that “the Greek communities in the state have little or no physical heritage dating much earlier than the early 20th century, when their churches were built; and the Cassimus House, currently under restoration…is possibly the oldest remaining; landmark associated with the early history of Greeks in Alabama.”

Now let us step back a minute here and review what we have been told. First it took Speridon Cassimus four to five years to earn the money to fulfill his promise. Maybe, but I find that hard to believe. Let’s do some rough calculations. Speridon Cassimus buys an acre lot in the most expensive neighborhood in town. Added to the expensive of the land Cassimus hires local workmen to build a large new finely appointed house from the ground up. Next he travels to Greece and brings back his wife and two children. All those expenses not counting the monies needed to ship and plant an unspecified number of fig trees and assorted plumbs. I don’t care how good a fruit stand merchant Speridon Cassimus might have been something must be missing from the historical account we have been provided with. While I am not sure what that might be the case since his father Alex lived with him and his family I think it is safe to assume some money was contributed by Alex Cassimus in this whole process.

But what about the Cassimus family? What happened to them? And why do we not hear more about them in the description of the house that Speridon Cassimus commissioned to be built? Newspaper articles, cemetery records and other accounts can provide us with some answers to these questions. Rather than worry that we do not have the whole story let us see what is readily known. Cemetery records report that Speridon and Mary Cassimus buried four infant children between 1895 and 1913, two boys and two girls.

While members of the extended Cassimus family arrived in Montgomery around 1878 I only managed to find newspaper accounts, for various members of the Cassimus family, starting in 1904 – a full 46 years after the family’s arrival. On October 12, 1904, Christopher J. Cassimus (b 1847) was killed by a trolley car in a horrific accident. Identified in one newspaper account as “Colonel C. J. Cassimus” we must assume that this member of the extended Cassimus kindred had received this honorary title –at least in this one news account – as an indication of the broader community’s respect for this man (Augusta Chronicle October 13, 1904). In the Montgomery Advertiser we learn that: “Mr. Cassimus was extremely popular in Montgomery. Mr. Cassimus being constantly at the stand, he was known to a large number of people. The fact that he was preparing to return to the home of his boyhood, solicited no little sympathy for the deceased and his family. On account of his large family connection around Montgomery, many fruit stands throughout the city closed yesterday evening (October 13, 1904).”

The wider history of Greeks in the United States can only be enriched by learning more about the Cassimus family, the Greek immigrants of Montgomery and the state of Alabama in general.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

1865 - Village of IERAKOS, Municipality of Zarakos, Province of Epidavros Limira (currently Laconia), Greece - FREE Translation of 1865 General Election List


The digital collections of the Greek State Archives offer a wealth of information to those of us interested in Greek genealogy.  As part of their online collection is the "Election Material From the Collection of Vlachoyiannis" .  This includes "General Election Lists" for each Municipality; recorded by community (city, village, settlement, etc.).

You can view a scanned copy of each list, printed in the Greek language.  This is a GREAT resource, but very difficult to navigate for those who do not read Greek.  Each row includes:  Line # -  Given Name, Surname - Father's Name -  Age - Occupation.

I have translated these pages and made them available in both Greek and English, doing my best to transcribe the information accurately.  I would always recommend viewing the original scanned copies (link below).  

- To the best of my knowledge, these lists include all Males who were eligible to vote in the elections.  

- Names are in alphabetical order by Given name (First name), many times recorded as an abbreviation.  Example:  Panag = Panagiotis.

- Since the names are in order by Given name you will have to look at the entire community to find multiple members of the family in the same village.  Many times a father is still alive and you will be able to find him in these electoral lists.  This can help advance you family history research back to the early 1800's.  Example:  Year of Election List is 1872.  Father's age is 65.  Birth year would be calculated as 1807.

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If you wish to share any of the translated information, please give appropriate credit and reference Hellenic Genealogy Geek at http://www.hellenicgenealogygeek.com along with my name (Georgia Stryker Keilman).  Thanks so much.
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VILLAGE OF IERAKOS
in the
Municipality of Zarakos

For your further reference, 
below is the Greek link to the online copies of the 
1865 Greek Electoral Rolls for this community

NOTE:  Χωριον Ιερακος – Village of Ierakos  (in many cases father’s names that were originally printed were crossed out and different handwritten names are inserted, hard to decipher)

Line # - Surname - Given Name - Age - Father's Name - Occupation

727 – Αναστασιος Λαζαρακης – 60 - ? - _____

727 – Anastasios Lazarakis – 60 - ? - _____

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728 – Αναστασιος Γεωργακοπουλος – 60 – Ιωαννης - _____

728 – Anastasios Georgakopoulos – 60 – Ioannis - _____

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729 – Ανδρεας Καραγιαννης – 45 - ? - _____

729 – Andreas Karagiannis – 45 - ? - _____

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730 – Ανδρεας καρογιαννης – 30 - ? – γεωργος

730 – Andreas Karogiannis – 30 - ? - farmer

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731 – Αγγελης Ανδρομιδας – 38 – Ιωαννης - _____

731 – Angelis Andromidas – 38 – Ioannis - _____

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732 – Αγγελης Λαζαρακης – 60 - ? – γεωργος

732 – Angelis Lazarakis – 60 - ? - farmer

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733 – Αποστολος Τζωρτζης – 35 - ? – γεωργος

733 – Apostolos Tzortzis – 35 - ? - farmer

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734 – Γεωργιος Γεωργακοπουλος – 35 - ? – γεωργος

734 – Georgios Georgakopoulos – 35 - ? - farmer

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735 – Γεωργιος Γεωργακοπουλος – 45 - ? – γεωργος

735 – Georgios Georgakopoulos – 45 - ? - farmer

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736 – Γεωρ. Ρεμπος η Ανδρομιδας – 28 – Ιωαννης - _____

736 – Geor. Rembos or Andromidas – 28 – Ioannis - _____

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737 – Γεωργιος Τζαβαλας – 65 – Ιωαννηςγεωργος

737 – Georgios Tzavalas – 65 – Ioannis - farmer

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738 – Γεωργιος καπελερης – 25 – Ιωαννηςγεωργος

738 – Georgios Kapeleris – 25 – Ioannis - farmer

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739 – Γεωργιος Λαζαρακης – 45 - ? – γεωργος

739 – Georgios Lazarakis – 45 - ? - farmer

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740 – Γεωργιος Σοφος – 30 - ? – γεωργος

740 – Georgios Sofos – 30 - ? - farmer

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741 - Γεωργιος Λυκος – 24 - ? - _____

741 – Georgios Lykos – 24 - ? - _____

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742 – Γεωργιος Ανδρομιδας – 30 - ? – γεωργος

742 – Georgios Andromidas – 30 - ? - farmer

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743 – Γεωργιος καραγιαννης – 28 - ? – γεωργος

743 – Georgios Karagiannis – 28 - ? - farmer

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744 – Δημητριος Λαζαρακης – 25 - ? – γεωργος

744 – Dimitrios Lazarakis – 25 - ? - farmer

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745 – Δημητριος Πετρου – 70 - ? – γεωργος

745 – Dimitrios Petrou – 70 - ? - farmer

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746 – Δημητριος Πραγματαρης – 26 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

746 – Dimitrios Pragmataris – 26 – Ioannis - farmer

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747 – Δημητριος Τζικοπουλος – 45 - ? – γεωργος

747 – Dimitrios Tzikopoulos – 45 - ? - farmer

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748 – Εμμανουηλ Σοφος – 32 - ? – γεωργος

748 – Emmanouil Sofos – 32 - ? - farmer

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749 – Εμμανουηλ Τζωρεζης – 50 - ? – γεωργος

749 – Emmanouil Tzorezis – 50 - ? - farmer

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750 – Ηλιας Καραγιαννης – 50 - ? – γεωργος

751 – Ilias Karagiannis – 50 - ? - farmer

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751 – Ηλιας Ρεμπου – 25 - ? – γεωργος

751 – Ilias Rembou – 25 - ? - farmer

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752 – Θεοδωρος Συφος – 40 - ? – γεωργος

752 – Theodoros Syfos – 40 - ? - farmer

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753 – Θεοδωρος καραγιαννης – 30 – γεωργος

753 – Theodoros Karagiannis – 30 - farmer

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754 – Ιωαννης Σοφος – 30 - ? – γεωργος

754 – Ioannis Sofos – 30 - ? - farmer

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755 – Θεοδωρος Καραγιαννης – 80 – Αναστασιος – γεωργος

755 – Theodoros Karagiannis – 80 – Anastasios - farmer

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756 – Ιωαννης Σοφος – 48 – Πετρακης – γεωργος

756 – Ioannis Sofos – 48 – Petrakis - farmer

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757 – Ιωαννης Πετρακης – 40 - ? – γεωργος

757 – Ioannis Petrakis – 40 - ? - farmer

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758 – Ιωαννης Λαζαρακης – 25 - ? – γεωργος

758 – Ioannis Lazarakis – 25 - ? - farmer

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759 – Ιωαννης Λαζαρακης – 26 - ? – γεωργος

759 – Ioannis Lazarakis – 26 - ? - farmer

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760 – Ιωαννης Γεωργακοπουλος – 50 - ? – γεωργος

760 – Ioannis Georgakopoulos – 50 - ? - farmer

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761 – Ιωαννης Τζαβαλας – 48 - ? – γεωργος

761 – Ioannis Tzavalas – 48 - ? - farmer

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762 – Ιω. Καπελε?ης η Βητορακης – 26 - ? – γεωργος

762 – Io. Kapele?is or Vitorakis – 26 - ? - farmer

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763 – Ιωαννης Ανδρομιδας – 26 - ? – γεωργος

763 – Ioannis Andromidas – 26 - ? - farmer

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764 – Ιωαννης Τζωρτζης – 28 - ? – γεωργος

764 – Ioannis Tzortzis – 28 - ? - farmer

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765 – Ιωαννης Τζαβαλας – 45 - ? – γεωργος

765 – Ioannis Tzavalas – 45 - ? - farmer

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766 – Κωνστας Γεωργακοπουλος – 27 - ? – γεωργος

766 – Konstas Georgakopoulos – 27 - ? - farmer

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767 – Κωνστας Τζαβαλας – 30 - ? – γεωργος

767 – Konstas Tzavalas – 30 - ? - farmer

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768 – Κωνστας Ρεμπος – 50 - ? – γεωργος

768 – Konstas Rembos – 50 - ? - farmer

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769 – Κωνστας Ανδρομιδας – 70 - ? – γεωργος

769 – Konstas Andromidas – 70 - ? - farmer

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770 – Κωνστας Λαζαρακης – 35 - ? – γεωργος

770 – Konstas Lazarakis – 35 - ? - farmer

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771 – Λαζαρος Λαζαρακης – 40 – Κωστας – γεωργος

771 – Lazaros Lazarakis – 40 – Kostas - farmer

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772 – Λαζαρος Λαζαρακης – 41 – Χρηστος – γεωργος

772 – Lazaros Lazarakis – 41 – Christos - farmer

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773 – Λαζαρος Λαυκας – 50 – Αγγελης – γεωργος

773 – Lazaros Lafkas – 50 – Angelis - farmer

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774 – Λαμπρος Λεκκας – 70 – Πανος – γεωργος

774 – Lambros Lekkas – 70 – Panos - farmer

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775 – Μιχαηλ Ανδρομιδας – 50 – Πανος – γεωργος

775 – Michail Andromidas – 50 – Panos - farmer

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776 – Πανος Λυκος – 55 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

776 – Panos Lykos – 55 – Ioannis - farmer

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777 – Πανος Λεκκας – 30 – Λαμπρινος – γεωργος

777 – Panos Lekkas – 30 – Lambrinos - farmer

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778 – Παναγιωτης Τζωρτζης – 32 – Αγγελης – γεωργος

778 – Panagiotis Tzortzis – 32 – Angelis - farmer

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779 – Πανος Τζαβαλας – 40 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

779 – Panos Tzavalas – 40 – Ioannis - farmer

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780 – Πανος Ροντος – 35 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

780 – Panos Rondos – 35 – Ioannis - farmer

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781 – Πετρος Πετρου – 45 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

781 – Petros Petrou – 45 – Ioannis - farmer

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782 – Σταυρος Κρητικος – 22 – Ιωαννης – γεωργος

782 – Stavros Kritikos – 22 – Ioannis - farmer

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783 – Φιλιππος Λαζαρακης – 32 – Αναστασιος – γεωργος

783 – Filippos Lazarakis – 32 – Anastasios - farmer

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784 – Χρηστος Λαζαρακης – 65 – Λαζαρος – γεωργος

784 – Christos Lazarakis – 65 – Lazaros - farmer

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785 – Χρηστος Πραγμα?αρης – 38 – Ιωαννης - γεωργος

785 – Christos Pragma?aris – 38 – Ioannis - farmer


Sunday, June 5, 2016

A Glimpse at Greek-American Mayors - Spanning Decades and States

A statue in Perry, IA honoring its mayor George Soumas.

SPANNING DECADES AND STATES,
A GLIMPSE AT GREEK-AMERICAN MAYORS

Published in The National Herald, May 7-13, 2016 Issue
Authored by Steve Frangos, TNH Staff Writer

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We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 



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CHICAGO- With the recent election of Chrysostomos (Chris) Alahouzos as mayor of Tarpon Springs, FL we are again reminded of the advances all Greeks have made in America. Alahouzos is far from the first Greek-born person to become mayor of an American city. As anyone following the national press on Alahouzos knows, he did not just spring out of the ground but has a long history of civic service including but not limited to being, in 2012, the Vice-Mayor of Tarpon Springs. And while Alahouzos may be the first Greek-born mayor of Tarpon Springs he is most certainly not the first mayor of Greek descent elected to that office in that specific city. Greeks have a complex and historically deep involvement with American politics.

In terms strictly of the office of mayor, at this moment in time, no one source or published account systematically lists every Greek-American who holds or has held this office in the United States. While the Greek press in North America has always carried coverage on any and all Hellenic candidates for any and all political office, again I know no listing of these figures across time. As far as I have been able to discover, it is only with the sustained survey work of the late Professor Charles C. Moskos that we have the first attempt at reviewing Greek political figures in the United States

In my own efforts to advance what Dr. Moskos first offered, I have been surprised by how fundamentally hard it has been to even gather a systematic listing of just mayors. It is to not simply difficult to determine the ethnicity or racial background of individual mayors but many American communities just do not have a full listing of their own local politicians. I stress this point because Moskos has written that “over a score of second-generation Greek-Americans have been chosen mayors in the mill towns of New England, a delayed culmination of the aspirations of the early Greek immigrants who toiled there.” I have not found twenty or more Greek-American mayors in New England. In point of fact I have been able to locate and confirm just forty seven Greek-American mayors in nineteen states.

I have made very specific distinctions in this mayoral survey. First, I have only included those individuals who held office, not those who ran but were not elected. Second, not every city in the nation has a mayor; many have councils, and so the president of a council can be seen as the leader and so similar in terms of the office of a mayor. But, words do have distinct meanings and so this survey deals just with those political office holders designated as mayors. With this same general thought in mind, individuals who are married to a Greek or person of Greek descent but who are themselves not of Greek birth or extraction are not included.

For our purposes here I have divided the United States into nine regions: New England, Mid-Atlantic States, Midwest, Appalachian Highlands, Southeast, Heartland, Mountain, Southwest, Pacific Coast inclusive of the noncontiguous states of Alaska and Hawaii. To simplify our survey let me quickly note I found no one of Hellenic background who is or who has been a mayor in the Mountain States: Colorado, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Wyoming or Nevada. 

In New England (e.g. Maine, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Rhode Island) we find one Greek-American mayor in Maine, the honorable Nicholas Mavodones (Portland) for Connecticut, George A. Athanson (Hartford) and George P. Harlamon (Waterbury). Massachusetts can claim seven: Monte Basbas (Newton); Louis J. Diamond (North Adams); George C. Eliades (Lowell); George Katsaros (Haverhill); Byron J. Mathews (Newburyport); Nick Mavroules (Peabody); and Tarsy T. Poulios (Lowell).

Next in New Hampshire, two Michael E. J. Blastos (Keene) and Ted Gatsas (Manchester) while, as far as I have been able to determine, Vermont has never had a mayor of Greek descent and finally Rhode Island with Dean Lewis in Newport.

In the Mid-Atlantic States (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York) we have Lee Alexander (Syracuse); John Cleo Apostol (Annapolis); Andrew J. Jakomas (McKeesport); Alex Jeffers (Williamsburg PA); Emmanuel K. Kallas (East Pittsburgh PA) Michael John Pantelidis (Annapolis MD) and then Andronic Pappas (Altoona PA)

For the Heartland states (Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri) Helen Boosalis (Lincoln, NE); Tom Jolas (Mason City, IA); George Soumas (Perry, IA) and then George J. Vavoulis (St. Paul, MN).

The Midwest (Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio) Nicholas Blasé (Niles, IL); George Chacharis (Gary, IN); P. Peter Chacos (Terre Haute, IN); H. Jonathon Costas (Valparaiso, IN); Adeline Jay Geo-Karis (Zion, IL); John B. Nicosia (East Chicago, IN); Samuel T. Pappas (Garden City, MI); James Pappas (Fox Lake, IL); Jim Plakas (Garden City, MI); Peter Anthony Sarantos (Elkhart, IN) and James Tassis (Ecorse, MI). 

In all of the Appalachian Highland states (Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia) we have only Bill Saffo (Wilmington, NC).

For the Southeast (South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana) we have the aforementioned Alahouzos, and also Constantine Apostolou (Pensacola, FL); George Cretekos (Clearwater, FL); James Nichols (Apalachicola, FL); Anita Protos (Tarpon Springs, FL); John Rousakis (Savanna, GA) and George Tsourakis (Tarpon Springs, FL).

For all of the Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas) we find only Anton Proto (Nogales, AZ)

Pacific Coast States (inclusive of the noncontiguous states) (Washington, Oregon, California, Alaska, Hawaii) Arthur Christ Agnos (San Francisco, CA); George Christopher (San Francisco, CA) and Tom Means (Mountain View, CA). While many readers would have preferred a detailed article on each of these individuals we must begin by knowing which Greek-Americans now hold or have held the office of mayor in Ameriki. Recently, it has been advanced that Martin Arguelles Sr. was not only the first mayor of San Agustin (St. Augustine) in the Florida territory of New Spain but that he was of Greek descent. Is this true? I don’t know. But that is how we move forward in Greek-American Studies. One suggestion at a time, vetted by the community at large and then the data is accepted or rejected as the evidence is reviewed by the world at large.

What else can we do? Facts are facts, no matter who uncovers them. At a time when more persons of Greek birth and or Greek descent are now to be found in the American educational system---from literally pre-school to the most prestigious universities in this nation—than at any other time in the history of this country, we have no scholars who are systematically reviewing, studying, assessing and then writing about our collective history in this hemisphere.

The politicians cited above are worthy of more extensive study. As a group they represent the very best and unfortunately, at times, the very worst of our community. Consequently as with all things Greek in North America, Greek-American mayors have achieved the highest honors inclusive of public monuments that their local community could provide as well as being found guilty of high crimes and sentenced to jail. It is an extremely odd mix to say the least. Ultimately we need to know more about our common history in the United States if we are ever to understand our place not only in this nation’s history but that of Hellenism itself.