Monday, February 29, 2016

Photograph Postcard - Salonica - The Church of the Twelve Apostles - date unknown, prior to 1917




FYI - I found this postcard available for sale on Ebay

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SALONICA

The Church of the Twelve Apostles

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No date available on photograph.
Writing on back of postcard dated November 1917.




Sunday, February 28, 2016

Photographic Postcard - Athens Greece, Patision Avenue




FYI - I found this postcard available for sale on Ebay

OLD PHOTOGRAPHIC POSTCARD

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Athens Greece

Patision Avenue

Year Unknown


Photograph - D'orient 1914-1916 campaign - Greece group fleeing 1st Bulgarian invasion



FYI - I found this postcard available for sale on Ebay

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Campagne D'orient 1914-1916
Groupe de Grece fuyant devant 1'invasion Bulgare

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D'orient 1914-1916 campaign
Greece Group fleeing first Bulgarian invasion



Greek Immigrants - ARIZONA, STATE COURT NATURALIZATION RECORDINGS 1869-1976



Ancestry.com
 has a new database titled ARIZONA, STATE COURT NATURALIZATION RECORDINGS 1869-1976 - includes 37 records for people born in Greece.

If you do not have a subscription to Ancestry.com, remember that you can access the program at most of your local libraries for FREE.

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Description of Database from Ancestry.com

Source Information:

Original data: Arizona County Naturalization Records. Arizona History and Archives Division, Phoenix, Arizona.

About Arizona, State Court Naturalization Records, 1869-1976

Introduction to Naturalization Records:

The act and procedure of becoming a citizen of a country is called naturalization. In the U.S., naturalization is a judicial procedure that flows from Congressional legislation. However, from the time the first naturalization act was passed in 1790 until 1906, there were no uniform standards. As a consequence, before September 1906, various federal, state, county, and local courts generated a wide variety of citizenship records that are stored in sundry courts, archives, warehouses, libraries, and private collections. After 1906 the vast majority of naturalizations took place in federal courts.
Naturalization laws have changed over the years. These acts are important to understand as they would have greatly impacted when your ancestor was able to become naturalized, as well as the exact process he or she had to go through to become a citizen. For example, some naturalization acts required residency in the U.S. for a certain number of years, some excluded certain ethnicities from being able to become citizens, and others granted citizenship status in exchange for military service.

The Naturalization Process:

The first responsibility for an immigrant wishing to become an official U.S. citizen was to complete a Declaration of Intention. These papers are sometimes called First Papers since they are the first forms to be completed in the naturalization process. Generally these papers were filled out fairly soon after an immigrant's arrival in America. Due to some laws, there were times when certain groups of individuals were exempt from this step.

After the immigrant had completed these papers and met the residency requirement (which was usually five years), the individual was able to submit his Petition for Naturalization. Petitions are also known as Second or Final Papers because they are the second and final set of papers completed in the naturalization process.
Immigrants also took a naturalization oath or oath of allegiance. A copy of this oath is often filed with the immigrant's first or second papers. After an immigrant had completed all citizenship requirements he was issued a certificate of naturalization. Many of these documents can be found in the records of the court in which they were created.

Other naturalization records include naturalization certificate stubs and certificates of arrival.

Many immigrants took out their First Papers as soon as they arrived in America, in whatever county and state that may have been. Later they would file their Second Papers in the location in which they took up residence.

What’s Included in this Database:

This collection includes images of naturalization records from Arizona courts in the counties of Cochise, Coconino, Gila, Pima, and Yuma for the years 1869 to 1976.
The naturalization records may contain:
Name of individual
Native country
Date of naturalization
Residence
Occupation
Birth date
Date and place of arrival
Children’s names



Thursday, February 18, 2016

Abandoned Ellis Island Morgue and Hospital Not Open for Tourist but Someone Went Behind the Scenes




Thanks to Jessica Causey for posting a link to this article on our Hellenic Genealogy Geek Facebook group.  

ABANDONED ELLIS ISLAND MORGUE AND HOSPITAL NOT OPEN FOR TOURIST BUT SOMEONE WENT BEHIND THE SCENES

Those who had ancestors who came through Ellis Island, or those who just find history interesting, might not expect that everyone who came through Ellis Island had to be meticulously inspected before being able to enter the United States as a citizen.

There were more than 12 million people who had hoped to make a better life for themselves in the United States during the years of 1892 and 1954.  However, those people who endured the long journey to make it the United States wouldn’t be let through if they failed the inspections.  And people who arrived sick had to be taken to Ellis Island’s hospital; those who died on the ship during the journey were taken to the morgue.
Today, Ellis Island is open for tours for those who want to learn more about their heritage and ancestors.  Nearly 40% of tourists who visit the island are able to trace their lineage back to their ancestors who arrived there.  The tourist attraction was briefly closed after Superstorm Sandy, but once it was cleaned up it was reopened for tours once more. While the inspection hall is open for viewing, the morgue and hospital remain closed.  Until now, many probably did not even realize that Ellis Island had a hospital and morgue. Both places have been untouched since 1954. . . . . 


Monday, February 15, 2016

Anti-Australian Sentiment toward Greeks in Perth in the Venizelos Era





ANTI-AUSTRALIAN SENTIMENT TOWARD GREEKS IN PERTH
IN THE VENIZELOS ERA


Published in The National Herald, November 21-27, 2015 Issue
Authored by Stavros T. Stavridis

------------------------------

We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 



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From September 1916 to June 1917 Greece had two rival administrations:  one under King Constantine in Athens and the Provisional Government under Eleftherios Venizelos in Thessaloniki.

This schism highlighted the political divisions existing in Greek society with the former pursuing a neutral foreign policy whereas the latter wanted to join the ranks of the Entente powers:  Britain, France, Russia, and Italy in fighting the Central Powers:  Germany, Austro-Hungary, Bulgaria and Ottoman Empire.  These divisions would major repercussions for the Greek-Australian community beyond the First World War.  In Australia, ordinary Anglo-Australians could not distinguish between Venizelists and Royalists and considered them suspect and possibly disloyal to the British Empire.

The occupation of Fort Rupel in May 1916, the establishment of the government in Thessaloniki, the demobilization of the Greek Army, the handover of mountain batteries, and the Benazet-Constantine agreement, led to the differences between the Anglo-French and Venizelists with King Constantine.

On December 1, 1916 the clash between Anglo-French marines and Greek Royalist forces in Athens (also known as the Noemvriana) would have a major impact on the small Greek-Australian community.  The Australian press described King Constantine action as full of "treachery," judged him "guilty," acted with "duplicity," was "cunning," "fooled the diplomats refusal to hand over guns," and acted with "perfidy."  Despite his neutral stance, he was known for his pro-German proclivities.

The Greeks in Melbourne (Victoria), Sydney (New South Wales), Brisbane (Queensland) and Perth (West Australia) passed resolutions supporting Eleftherios Venizelos and expressing allegiance to the British Empire.  It is worth noting that Australian Government had earlier conducted a secret census in June 1916 to ascertain the number of Greeks domiciled in Australia.  This information was divided into two categories:  Form A (Return of Greeks giving personal particulars which included address, name of person, sex, age, occupation, nature of transport, distance from capital city and remarks) and Form B (Return of places where Greeks are known to congregate which showed locality, means of communication:  nature of transport and distance from capital city, club, cafe, or other institution, name of manager, number of persons and remarks).  The remarks column highlighted a very small number of Royalist sympathizers in Australia.

It was the Greeks of West Australia (WA) who suffered the most of their compatriots in Australia.  Greek businesses in Perth, Kalgoorlie, a goldmining town, and Boulder were destroyed and looted by rioters.  Press reports highlighted that 100 Greeks fled Kalgoorlie for Perth.  The events that unfolded in Constantine's Greece between September and December 1916 were widely reported in the Perth and Kalgoorlie press displaying anti-Constantine headlines.  Such headlines would have influenced these hotheads not to be able to distinguish between Venizelists and Royalists.  Rioters were arrested and prosecuted with some serving jail time for their actions.  There was an antipathy for Greeks in Australia like in the United States during the Great War.

The Western Australian Greeks were concerned for their safety and requested the protection of the British Government.  They cabled Venizelos in Thessaloniki, asking him to lodge a protest on their behalf in London.  Venizelos informed them to make representations to the Governor-General of Australia, Sir Ronald Munro Ferguson, 1914-20 regarding their concerns.  Finally, this came to the attention of the Australian Prime Minister, William Hughes who cabled the Premier of WA to investigate the riots that had taken place.

These communications high-lighted two aspects of the Australian political system at this time.  Firstly, all official communication sent by the Australian Prime Minister went via the Governor-General to the Colonial Office in London and vice versa; and secondly, the Federal Government had no jurisdiction as the riots came within the purview of the State Government of WA.

The Greeks of Perth were characterized as disloyal and treacherous by Anglo-Australians and dispelled such notions by showing their loyal to the British Empire.  They prayed for an allied victor and even a tiny number of pro-Constantine sympathizers were horrified as to what occurred in Athens.  Many Greeks were British subjects and had been resident for more than 20 years in West Australia.  They sought compensation for destruction to their businesses.

The Greek Consul in Perth filed for damages but was declined by the WA Government.  Originally, the victims' claims of £11,728-4-0 was reduced to £5388-10-0 on the recommendation of Commissioner, A. Green.  Moreover, representations to the Australian Government in 1917, 1920, and 1921 for compensation was declined on each occasion despite the Greek Government's approach to London.  There were Greeks who hired private counsel to recover damages for their losses only to be rebuffed by the Australian Government on April 9, 1919.

This issue dragged on for more than a decade when the Consul General for Greece, L. Chrysanthopoulos, a career diplomat, requested on February 21, 1930 for a reconsideration of the Greek claims.  The Australian Government declined to reopen the case for three reasons.  Firstly, a long time had elapsed when this event occurred and the Attorney General's department had never rendered a legal opinion on it; secondly, the Departments of Treasury and Defense made the original decision of not providing compensation; and finally, it seems the Australian Government sought to find a legal avenue to avoid paying compensation and cited an instance to shore up its position.  The WA Premier informed the Federal Government in January 1917 that the police exercised all due diligence in trying to quell the riots and to afford protection.  Furthermore, police arrests and convictions obtained was insufficient.  There was no evidence to back up this claim.

However, the Australian Government laid down principles based on international law to cover such a future eventuality for compensation.  It stated:  "(a) A State is responsible for damages caused to the person or property of a foreigner by persons taking part in a riot or mob violence.  If the movement is directed against foreigners as such, or against persons of a particular nationality, when it is shown by the claimant State that there was negligence on its part or on the part of its officials to prevent the damage; and (b) in a federal State the Federal Government assumes this responsibility."

In conclusion, the Greek-Australians in Perth were over-whelmingly pro-Venizelist and concerned as to what happened in Athens.  The refusal of both the Australian and WA Governments to pay compensation highlighted its discriminatory position towards the Greek community.  It is regrettable that the political divisions in Greece impacted this small community and also exposed the anti-Greek sentiment in some sections of Anglo-Australian society.




Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Greek Americans: Small Part of U.S. Population, but with Strong Heritage, Identity


GREEK-AMERICANS:
SMALL PART OF U.S. POPULATION, BUT WITH STRONG HERITAGE, IDENTITY



Published in The National Herald, December 12-18, 2015 Issue
Authored by Professor Alexander Kitroeff
Special to The National Herald

------------------------------

We are excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 


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For several decades, the total number of persons of Greek ancestry has hovered around 0.4% of the total population in the United States.  Despite the relatively small numbers, Greek Americans maintain a strong sense of Hellenic heritage.


This combination generates a seemingly constant angst about the ethnic group's survival.  The American Hellenic Institute (AHI) convenes an annual conference entitled "The Future of Hellenism in America."  Several Greek-American organizations consider the preservation of the Greek language not just a priority but also a matter of life and death for the community.

Yet for all its professed concern about preserving identity, the Greek-American community knows relatively little about itself in terms of its demography.  For example, the Jewish Americans, whom Greek-Americans frequently cite as a mode of ethnic cohesion, do much better at constantly counting and assessing their numbers in order to maintain their sense of community.  Brandeis University runs the American Jewish Population Project; in 2001, Jewish American organizations spent nearly $6 million for a National Jewish Population Survey.  Meanwhile, others such as the Pew Research Center conduct similar demographic inquiries about the Jews in America.  

Nothing comparable exists for the Greek-Americans.  There was a nation-wide Gallup survey of Greek America commissioned by Archbishop Iakovos in 1980.  Since then, the only sources for assessing the community's profile are small scale surveys generated by scholars such as the late Alice Scourby and more recently by Angelyn Balodimas-Bartolomei among others.  And for a long time, the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese's Yearbook has recorded the number of parishes and vital statistics such as baptisms, marriages and funerals.  There is of course the information available from the U.S. Census Bureau, which valuable but too general for any in-depth analysis, not to mention that every successive decade seems to contain less and less information about European-origin ethnic groups.

At best, what is currently available from the census confirms what is common knowledge about the community.  The data, such that it is, including a focus on New York City, has been nicely collated by Professor Nicholas Alexiou of Queens College CUNY and is available on the College's Hellenic American Oral History Project website.  To summarize, compared to the average in the United States, persons of Greek ancestry are better educated, with women ahead of men, they have a higher rate of employment and higher individual and family earnings and, not surprisingly, a lower rate of poverty.  In terms of employment the most common sectors for the Greek Americans are education & health care, professional and scientific and retail.  These are barn door-size type of categories that need further processing.  Most disappointingly, the census does not measure employment in the food industry where the Greeks are so prominent.  

Occasionally, additional information pops up in unexpected sources.  An example is an infographic, and eye-catching depiction of statistics, which recently made the rounds of social media.  It represented the percentage of small business owners among foreign-born immigrants in the United States Drawn up by a pro-immigration and pro-refugee advocacy group, Migreat, and based on a survey by the New York based Fiscal Policy Institute, it provided the added bonus of shedding light on Greek immigrant entrepreneurs.

Although the overall numbers of Greek-born business-owners were naturally much smaller than those from countries such as Mexico, India, Korea, China and Vietnam, nonetheless the Greeks came out top in terms of the percentage of business owners in relation to the total number of migrants.  The survey counted 74,798 persons from Greece in the U.S. labor force and 12,105 or 16% of them owned small businesses by the time they had stayed in the country for a decade, with 6% of them acquiring businesses in less than ten years.  Migrants from Israel/Palestine (the Census does not disaggregate the two) had the second highest rate of business ownership with 13% of the total, followed by migrants from Syria with 12%.

The overall results indicate that immigrants from the Eastern Mediterranean have a propensity to become small business owners.  Why this happens is something beyond the original concerns of the Fiscal Policy Institute, but credit to them for producing much more detailed information compared to that the US. Census is designed to gather.  To go even further, and learn more about these Greek immigrant businessmen for example the sectors they are in, their gender distribution, their overall economic clout and their ties with the wider community and views about its future, Greek America would have to get more serious about investigating its own numbers.

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Professor Alexander Kitroeff teaches history at Haverford College and is writing a book on the history of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America.  Follow him on Twitter @Kitro1908 or email him at akitroef@haverford.edu


Saturday, February 6, 2016

Village of LOWER DAVIA, Municipality of Falanthou, Region of Mantineias, Greece - FREE Translation of 1879 General Election List




The digital collections of the Greek State Archives offer a wealth of information to those of us interested in Greek genealogy.  As part of their online collection is the "Election Material From the Collection of Vlachoyiannis" .  This includes "General Election Lists" for each Municipality; recorded by community (city, village, settlement, etc.).

You can view a scanned copy of each list, printed in the Greek language.  This is a GREAT resource, but very difficult to navigate for those who do not read Greek.  Each row includes:  Line # -  Given Name, Surname - Father's Name -  Age - Occupation.

I have translated these pages and made them available in both Greek and English, doing my best to transcribe the information accurately.  I would always recommend viewing the original scanned copies (link below).  

- To the best of my knowledge, these lists include all Males who were eligible to vote in the elections.  

- Names are in alphabetical order by Given name (First name), many times recorded as an abbreviation.  Example:  Panag = Panagiotis.

- Since the names are in order by Given name you will have to look at the entire community to find multiple members of the family in the same village.  Many times a father is still alive and you will be able to find him in these electoral lists.  This can help advance you family history research back to the early 1800's.  Example:  Year of Election List is 1872.  Father's age is 65.  Birth year would be calculated as 1807.

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If you wish to share any of the translated information, please give appropriate credit and reference Hellenic Genealogy Geek at http://www.hellenicgenealogygeek.com along with my name (Georgia Stryker Keilman).  Thanks so much.
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VILLAGE OF LOWER DAVIA
in the
Municipality of Falanthou

For your further reference, 
below is the Greek link to the online copies of the 
1879 Greek Electoral Rolls for this community



Line # - Surname - Given Name - Father's Name - Age - Occupation - Present Residence


1225 -  Αθανασοπουλος Κωνσταντινος – Αθανασιος – 62 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1225 – Athanasopoulos Konstandinos – Athanasios – 62 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1226 – Αθανασοπουλος Προκοπιος – Κωνσταντινος – 27 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1226 – Athanasopoulos Prokopios – Konstandinos – 27 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1227 – Αθανασοπουλος Βασιλειος – Κωνσταντινος – 30 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1227 – Athanasopoulos Vasileios – Konstandinos – 30 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1228 – Γουλης Φιλιππος – Σταυρος – 57 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1228 – Goulis Filippos – Stavros – 57 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1229 – Γουλης Γεωργιος – Φιλιππος – 27 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1229 – Goulis Georgios – Filippos – 27 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1230 – Γιαννακοπουλος Βασιλειος – Σωτηρος – 26 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1230 – Giannakopoulos Vasileios – Sotiros – 26 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1231 – Γιαννακοπουλος Δημητριος – Γιαννακης – 64 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1231 – Giannakopoulos Dimitrios – Giannakis – 64 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1232 – Γιαννακοπουλος Γεωργιος – Δημητριος – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1232 – Giannakopoulos Georgios – Dimitrios – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1233 – Δαμοπουλος Θεοδωρος – Αδαμης – 50 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1233 – Damopoulos Theodoros – Adamis – 50 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1234 – Ζουνατιωτης Γεωργιος – Δημητριος – 47 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1234 – Zounatiotis Georgios – Dimitrios – 47 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1235 – Κωτζιονης Θεοδωρος – Χρηστος – 37 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1235 – Kotzonis Theodoros – Christos – 37 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1236 – Κωτζιονης Σταικος – Χρηστος – 42 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1236 – Kotzonis Staikos – Christos – 42 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1237 – Μελος Παναγιωτης – Γιαννακης – 40 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1237 – Melos Panagiotis – Giannakis – 40 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1238 – Μπηκος Θεοδωρος – Γεωργιος – 57 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1238 – Bikos Theodoros – Georgios – 57 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1239 – Μπηκος Γεωργιος – Θεοδωρος – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1239 – Bikos Georgios – Theodoros – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1240 – Μπηκος Κωνσταντινος - Θεοδωρος – 28 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1240 – Bikos Konstandinos – Theodoros – 28 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1241 – Ξυδης Γεωργιος – Νικολαος – 37 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1241 – Xydis Georgios – Nikolaos – 37 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1242 – Ξυδης Κωνσταντινος – Νικολαος – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1242 – Xydis Konstandinos – Nikolaos – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1243 – Σαμπαλης Αποστολης – Αναστασιος – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1243 – Sambalis Apostolis – Anastasios – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1244 – Τομπρος Πουλος – Δημητριος – 54 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1244 – Tombros Poulos – Dimitrios – 54 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1245 – Τομπρος Νικολαος – Πουλος – 24 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1245 – Tombros Nikolaos – Poulos – 24 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1246 – Τσουρνος Ηλιας – Ιωαννης – 47 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1246 – Tsournos Ilias – Ioannis – 47 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1247 – Τσουρνος Σωτηρος – Χρηστος – 52 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1247 – Tsournos Sotiros – Christos – 52 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1248 – Ταμπασης Γεωργιος – Παναγος – 64 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1248 – Tambasis Georgios – Panagos – 64 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1249 – Ταμπασης Χαραλαμπος – Γεωργιος – 27 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1249 – Tambasis Charalambos – Georgios – 27 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1250 – Ταμπασης Δημητρακης – Κωνσταντινος – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1250 – Tambasis Dimitrakis – Konstandinos – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1251 – Ταμπασης Παναγος – Ιωαννης – 32 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1251 – Tambasis Panagos – Ioannis – 32 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1252 – Ταμπασης Κωνσταντινος – Ιωαννης – 25 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1252 – Tambasis Konstandinos – Ioannis – 25 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1253 – Τσουρνος Τασης – Παναγιωτης – 28 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1253 – Tsournos Tasis – Panagiotis – 28 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1254 – Τσουρνος Αθανασιος – Παναγιωτης – 42 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1254 – Tsournos Athanasios – Panagiotis – 42 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1255 – Τσουρνος Νικολαος – Παναγιωτης – 34 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1255 – Tsournos Nikolaos – Panagiotis – 34 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1256 – Χαρπιλας Κωνσταντινος – Παναγιωτης – 62 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1256 – Charpilas Konstandinos – Panagiotis – 62 – farmer – Lower Davia

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1257 – Χαρπιλας Γεωργιος – Κωνσταντινος – 40 – γεωργος – Κατω Δαβια

1257 – Charpilas Georgios – Konstandinos – 40 – farmer – Lower Davia

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Thursday, February 4, 2016

Village of UPPER DAVIA, Municipality of Falanthou, Region of Mantineias, Greece - FREE Translation of 1879 General Election List



The digital collections of the Greek State Archives offer a wealth of information to those of us interested in Greek genealogy.  As part of their online collection is the "Election Material From the Collection of Vlachoyiannis" .  This includes "General Election Lists" for each Municipality; recorded by community (city, village, settlement, etc.).

You can view a scanned copy of each list, printed in the Greek language.  This is a GREAT resource, but very difficult to navigate for those who do not read Greek.  Each row includes:  Line # -  Given Name, Surname - Father's Name -  Age - Occupation.

I have translated these pages and made them available in both Greek and English, doing my best to transcribe the information accurately.  I would always recommend viewing the original scanned copies (link below).  

- To the best of my knowledge, these lists include all Males who were eligible to vote in the elections.  

- Names are in alphabetical order by Given name (First name), many times recorded as an abbreviation.  Example:  Panag = Panagiotis.

- Since the names are in order by Given name you will have to look at the entire community to find multiple members of the family in the same village.  Many times a father is still alive and you will be able to find him in these electoral lists.  This can help advance you family history research back to the early 1800's.  Example:  Year of Election List is 1872.  Father's age is 65.  Birth year would be calculated as 1807.

-----
If you wish to share any of the translated information, please give appropriate credit and reference Hellenic Genealogy Geek at http://www.hellenicgenealogygeek.com along with my name (Georgia Stryker Keilman).  Thanks so much.
-----


VILLAGE OF UPPER DAVIA
in the
Municipality of Falanthou

For your further reference, 
below is the Greek link to the online copies of the 
1879 Greek Electoral Rolls for this community


Line # - Surname - Given Name - Father's Name - Age - Occupation - Present Residence

1181 – Γεωργοπουλος Θεοδωρος – Νικολαος – 44 – γεωργος – Ανω Δαβια

1181 – Georgopoulos Theodoros – Nikolaos – 44 – farmer – Upper Davia

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1182 – Γεωργοπουλος Σωτηρος – Αθανασιος – 57 – γεωργος – Ανω Δαβια

1182 – Georgopoulos Sotiros – Athanasios – 57 – farmer – Upper Davia

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1183 – Δημηοπουλος Δημητρακης – Δημος – 54 – γεωργος – Ανω Δαβια

1183 – Dimiopoulos Dimitrakis – Dimos – 54 – farmer – Upper Davia

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1184 – Δημοπουλος Κωνσταντινος – Αθανασιος – 38 – γεωργος – Ανω Δαβια

1184 – Dimopoulos Konstandinos – Athanasios – 38 – farmer – Upper Davia

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1185 – Ζουζουλας Δημητριος – Γεωργιος – 57 – γεωργος – Ανω Δαβια

1185 – Zouzoulas Dimitrios – Georgios – 57 – farmer – Upper Davia

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1186 – Ζουζουλας Βασιλειος – Γεωργιος – 54 – αμπατζης – Τριπολις

1186 – Zouzoulas Vasileios – Georgios – 54 – makes clothes from a special type of very strong wool - Tripolis

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1187 – Ζουζουλας Κωνσταντινος – Γεωργιος – 46 – Δημαρχος – Πιανα

1187 – Zouzoulas Konstandinos – Georgios – 46 – Mayor - Piana

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1188 – Ζουζουλας Ηλιας – Δημητριος – 32 – αμπατζης – Τριπολις

1188 – Zouzoulas Ilias – Dimitrios – 32 - – makes clothes from a special type of very strong wool - Tripolis

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1189 – Ζουζουλας Γεωργιος – Δημητριος – 25 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1189 – Zouzoulas Georgios – Dimitrios – 25 – farmer - Davia

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1190 – Ζουζουλας Αθανασιος – Δημητριος – 24 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1190 – Zouzoulas Athanasios – Dimitrios – 24 – farmer - Davia

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1191 – Ηλιοπουλος Κωνσταντινος – Ηλιας – 57 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1191 – Iliopoulos Konstandinos – Ilias – 57 – farmer - Davia

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1192 – Ηλιοπουλος Δημητρακης – Ηλιας – 58 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1192 – Iliopoulos Dimitrakis – Ilias – 58 – farmer - Davia

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1193 – Ηλιοπουλος Ηλιας – Δημητρακης – 30 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1193 – Iliopoulos Ilias – Dimitrakis – 30 – farmer - Davia

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1194 – Ηλιοπουλος Σωτηρος – Κωνσταντινος – 24 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1194 – Iliopoulos Sotiros – Konstandinos – 24 – farmer - Davia

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1195 – Καραλης Δημητριος – Παναγος – 47 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1195 – Karalis Dimitrios – Panagos – 47 – farmer - Davia

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1196 – Καραλης Ιωαννης – Γεωργιος – 52 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1196 – Karalis Ioannis – Georgios – 52 – farmer - Davia

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1197 – Καραλης Δημητριος – Ιωαννης – 25 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1197 – Karalis Dimitrios – Ioannis – 25 – farmer - Davia

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1198 – Κυριαζοπουλος Ιωαννης – Κυριαζης – 57 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1198 – Kyriazopoulos Ioannis – Kyriazis – 57 – farmer - Davia

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1199 – Κυριαζοπουλος Παρασκευας – Γεωργιος – 40 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1199 – Kyriazopoulos Paraskevas – Georgios – 40 – farmer - Davia

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1200 – Κυριαζοπουλος Ιωαννης – Γεωργιος – 34 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1200 – Kyriazopoulos Ioannis – Georgios – 34 – farmer - Davia

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1201 – Λυμπεροπουλος Αναστασιος – Γεωργιος – 52 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1201 – Lymberopoulos Anastasios – Georgios – 52 – farmer - Davia

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1202 – Λυμπεροπουλος Κωνσταντινος – Γεωργιος – 37 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1202 – Lymberopoulos Konstandinos – Georgios – 37 – farmer - Davia

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1203 – Μουσελιμης Ανδρεας – Σταυρος – 25 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1203 – Mouselimis Andreas – Stavros – 25 – farmer - Davia

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1204 – Παππανικολαου Κυριακος – Νικολαος – 30 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1204 – Pappanikolaou Kyriakos – Nikolaos – 30 – farmer - Davia

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1205 – Ταμπασης Θεοδωρος – Παναγος – 62 – ποιμην – Δαβια

1205 – Tambasis Theodoros – Panagos – 62 – shepherd - Davia

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1206 – Τζιαμας Παναγος – Δημητριος – 48 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1206 – Tziamas Panagos Dimitrios – 48 – farmer - Davia

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1207 – Τζιρμπας Γεωργιος – Νικολαος – 52 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1207 – Tzimbas Georgios – Nikolaos – 52 – farmer - Davia

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1208 – Τριαντος Αθανασιος – Κωνσταντινος – 72 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1208 – Triandos Athanasios – Konstandinos – 72 – farmer - Davia

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1209 – Τριαντος Χρηστος – Αθανασιος – 40 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1209 – Triandos Christos – Athanasios – 40 – farmer - Davia

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1210 – Τριαντος Γεωργιος – Δημητριος – 30 - _____ - _____

1210 – Triandos Georgios – Dimitrios – 30 - _____ - _____

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1211 – Τριαντος Ιωαννης – Δημητριος – 32 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1211 – Triandos Ioannis – Dimitrios – 32 – farmer - Davia

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1212 – Τριαντος Ανδριανος – Δημητριος – 43 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1212 – Triandos Andrianos – Dimitrios – 43 – farmer - Davia

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1213 – Τριαντος Κωνσταντινος – Δημητριος – 50 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1213 – Triandos Konstandinos – Dimitrios – 50 – farmer - Davia

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1214 – Τριαντος Νικολαος – Δημητριος – 40 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1214 – Triandos Nikolaos – Dimitrios – 40 – farmer - Davia

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1215 – Τριαντος Αναστασιος – Δημητριος – 25 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1215 – Triandos Anastasios – Dimitrios – 25 – farmer - Davia

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1216 – Τριαντος Ηλιας – Νικολαος – 36 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1216 – Triandos Ilias – Nikolaos – 36 – farmer - Davia

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1217 – Τριαντος Μαρκος – Παναγος – 54 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1217 – Triandos Markos – Panagos – 54 – farmer - Davia

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1218 – Τριαντος Κωνσταντινος – Βασιλειος – 72 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1218 – Triandos Konstandinos – Vasileios – 72 – farmer - Davia

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1219 – Τριαντος Βασιλειος – Κωνσταντινος – 26 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1219 – Triandos Vasileios – Konstandinos – 26 – farmer - Davia

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1220 – Τριαντος Αριστειδης – Κωνσταντινος – 24 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1220 – Triandos Aristeidis – Konstandinos – 24 – farmer - Davia

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1221 – Τερζης Αθανασιος – Νικολαος – 54 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1221 – Terzis Athanasios – Nikolaos – 54 – farmer - Davia

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1222 – Τερζης Κωνσταντινος – Νικολαος – 50 – χωροφυλαξ – Τριπολις

1222 – Terzis Konstandinos – Nikolaos – 50 – constable, ranger - Tripolis

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1223 – Τερζης Χαραλαμπος – Νικολαος – 47 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1223 – Terzis Charalambos – Nikolaos – 47 – farmer - Davia

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1224 – Χρονης Κωνσταντινος – Γεωργιος – 25 – γεωργος – Δαβια

1224 – Chronis Konstandinos – Georgios – 25 – farmer - Davia