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Showing posts from December, 2018

The Byzantine Princess and the Fork, East-West Culture Clash

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The Byzantine Princess and the Fork, East-West Culture Clash
by Steve Frangos Published in The National Herald, December 1, 2018
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I am excited that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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When I was growing up, I heard many a tale of Greeks, from Classical times to reminiscences shared with me by my grandparents and their generation. One reoccurring set of stories was how Byzantine Empire refugees transmitted culture to the West. We gave the ‘light’ to the West, I was told repeatedly. As Greeks and other peoples of the eastern Mediterranean, North Africa, and the Balkans were escaping from Ottoman domination they brought new information, materials and skills to Europe and so, I was told, helped to launch the Renaissance. I was in college before I found out such claims really bothered my professors.
Academic objections aside, certainly some cultural co…

Website Live - Ottoman Greeks in the U.S. Project

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Message from George Topalidis, Ph.D. Student - Department of Sociology and Criminology & Law, University of Florida, OGUS Project Coordinator

Message dated December 20, 2018

Dear Friends of the OGUS Project, 

I have some exciting news! Our webpage at the University of Florida's Samuel Proctor Oral History Program is officially online!

It contains the following sections. 

1. The Collections - 2D images, documents in Demotic Greek, English, Karamanlidika, Katharevousa, Rumca, Ottoman, and Turkish, 3D renditions of objects, and interviews with descendants of immigrants from the former Ottoman Empire to the US. (We are awaiting the connection with the University of Florida's Digital Collection.)

2. The Map - An interactive map tracing migration from the Ottoman Empire to the US between 1904-1924. 

3. Researchers - Biographies of our research team. 

Feel free to browse! 

https://ogus.oral.history.ufl.edu/
Please like and share. Help us raise awareness about this important research. 

Georg…

Fallen Greek Soldiers of World War II Reinterred in Albanian Military Cemetery

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Fallen Greek Soldiers of World War II Reinterred in Albanian Military Cemetery

Published in The National Herald, October 27, 2018
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I am excited that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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GJIROKASTER, ALBANIA - The remains of 573 Greek soldiers and officers who fought in the Greco-Italian War of 1940-1941 and died in Albania were reburied at the military cemetery of Dragoti on October 12.
The burial is part of a bilateral agreement calling for exhumation, identification, and re-interment at Albanian cemeteries of Greeks killed in the country.
The 573 were among nearly 700 who had been buried hastily during the Italian retreat after a battle at the straits of Kelcyre (Kleisoura, in Greek).  A search for the remains began there in January 2017, and the first 100 found were reburied at Bularat (Vouliarates) in July of this year.
At Dragoti cemetery, wher…

A Stitch in Time: Cyprus' Lefkaritiko Lace Faces Grim Future

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A Stitch in Time:  Cyprus' Lefkaritiko Lace Faces Grim Future

Published in The National Herald, November 24, 2018
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I am excited that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 
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LEFKARA, Cyprus (AP) — Legend has it that the intricate needlework used in embroidery known as 'Lefkaritiko lace' was of such high quality that Leonardo Da Vinci himself bought a tablecloth when he visited this mountainous village in the late 15th century and gifted it to Milan's cathedral. 
Local merchant Demosthenes Rouvis contends that the zig-zag pattern adorning the tablecloth on which Jesus Christ and his disciples dine in Da Vinci's masterpiece "The Last Supper" closely resembles those found on "Lefkaritiko" embroidery. 
But this centuries-old tradition is under threat now, falling prey to more modern trends — tourists with an eye f…