Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Greeks Have a Long History in Thailand


by Ioanna Zikakou 

Published by the Greek Reporter - World on March 28, 2015

According to an old saying, there is a Greek person under every rock, meaning that Greeks have spread out across the world, and they are getting involved in the everyday lives of their respective countries. 

Costantin Gerachi, also known as Constance Phaulkon, was a Greek adventurer born in 1687 within the fortress of Asso in northern Cephalonia to Greek Orthodox parents. Phaulkon worked for England’s East India Company and later, in 1675, he traveled to Siam -today’s Thailand- as a merchant. He was fluent in English, French, Portuguese, Malay and Thai, so in just a few years he began working at the court of King Narai as a translator. Due to his experience with the East India Company, he was soon able to become the king’s prime counsellor, working in the country’s Treasury. 

Phaulkon quickly rose among the ranks of nobles in Siam, becoming highly influential within the court. He was married to a Catholic woman of mixed Japanese-Portuguese-Bengali descent named Maria Guyomar de Pinha and had two sons, João and Jorge. Guyomar is famous for introducing new dessert recipes in Thai food at the Ayutthaya court, based on Portuguese culinary influence. When King Nirai became terminally ill, Pra Phetracha, the foster brother of Narai, staged a coup d’état, leading to the 1688 Siamese revolution. Phaulkon and several other royal court members were executed on June 5, 1688, without the king’s knowledge. 

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE: http://world.greekreporter.com/2015/03/28/greeks-long-history-in-thailand/



Photograph - A Cretan woman making linen thread



Part of the process of making linen thread...
A Cretan woman rubbing the dried linen grass down a board across a circle of nails to separate the filaments.....

This photograph is being shared from a Facebook post by our HellenicGenealogyGeek.com friend Helene Semanderes.  Source of original photograph unknown.



Friday, March 20, 2015

19,635 born in Greece - New Jersey Census Records




FamilySearch.org has FREE databases that will allow you to view census forms for people listed as being born in Greece and residing in New Jersey.

LINK TO 19,365 RECORDS

Includes the following record sets:

United States Census, 1850 
United States Census, 1860
United States Census, 1870
United States Census, 1880
United States Census, 1900
United States Census, 1910
New Jersey, State Census, 1915
United States Census, 1920
United States Census, 1930
United States Census of Merchant Seamen, 1930
United States Census, 1940

Each year the census form is different and FamilySearch.org does a great job of providing information for each year.  (Click on a name and then follow the link on the right hand side titled "About this collection".)

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Village of PETRINA, Municipality of Falaisias, Region of Megalopolis, Greece - FREE Translation of 1875 General Election List



The digital collections of the Greek State Archives offer a wealth of information to those of us interested in Greek genealogy.  As part of their online collection is the "Election Material From the Collection of Vlachoyiannis" .  This includes "General Election Lists" for each Municipality; recorded by community (city, village, settlement, etc.).

You can view a scanned copy of each list, printed in the Greek language.  This is a GREAT resource, but very difficult to navigate for those who do not read Greek.  Each row includes:  Line # -  Given Name, Surname - Father's Name -  Age - Occupation.

I have translated these pages and made them available in both Greek and English, doing my best to transcribe the information accurately.  I would always recommend viewing the original scanned copies (link below).  

- To the best of my knowledge, these lists include all Males who were eligible to vote in the elections.  

- Names are in alphabetical order by Given name (First name), many times recorded as an abbreviaton.  Example:  Panag = Panagiotis.

- Since the names are in order by Given name you will have to look at the entire community to find multiple members of the family in the same village.  Many times a father is still alive and you will be able to find him in these electoral lists.  This can help advance you family history research back to the early 1800's.  Example:  Year of Election List is 1872.  Father's age is 65.  Birth year would be calculated as 1807.

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If you wish to share any of the translated information, please give appropriate credit and reference Hellenic Genealogy Geek at http://www.hellenicgenealogygeek.com along with my name (Georgia Stryker Keilman).  Thanks so much.
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VILLAGE OF PETRINA
in the
Municipality of Falaisias

For your further reference, 
below is the Greek link to the online copies of the 
1875 Greek Electoral Rolls for this community


Line # - Given Name - Surname - Father's Name - Age - Occupation

568 – Αθανασιος Γιαννακοπουλος – Γεωργιος – 24 - _____

568 - Athanasios Giannakopoulos - Georgios - 24 - _____

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569 – Αθανασιος Παναγοπουλος – Παναγος – 52 - _____

569 - Athanasios Panagopoulos - Panagos - 52 - _____

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570 – Αναστασιος Μιχος – Ηλιας – 34 - _____

570 - Anastasios Michos - Ilias - 34 - _____

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571 –Αναγνωστης Πολυχρονοπουλος – Γιαννακης – 45 - _____

571 - Anagnostis Polychronopoulos - Giannakis - 45 - _____

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572 –Αθανασιος Τζιαλαματας – Νικολαος – 65 - _____

572 - Athanasios Tzialamatas - Nikolaos - 65 - _____

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573 –Αθανασιος Μιχος – Ηλιας – 27 - _____

573 - Athanasios  Michos - Ilias - 27 - _____

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574 – θανασιος Τζιαλαματας – Ιωαννης – 25 - _____

574 - Athanasios Tzialamatas - Ioannis - 25 - _____

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575 –Aθανασιος Φουντας – Γεωργιος – 25 - _____

575 - Athanasios Foundas - Georgios - 25 - _____

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576 –Αριστειδης Πολυκρονοπουλος – Γεωργιος – 22 -  _____

576 - Aristidis Polykronopoulos - Georgios - 22 - _____

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577 - Βασιλειος Κεκες - Κωνσταντινος - 48 -  _____

577 - Vasileios Kekes - Konstandinos - 48 - _____

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578 - Βασιλειος Ταλαμανας - Γεωργιος - 32 -  _____

578 - Vasileios Talamanas - Georgios - 32 - _____

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579 - Βασιλειος Ταλαμανας - Αναστος - 32 -  _____

579 - Vasileios Talamanas - Anastos - 32 - _____

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580 - Βασιλειος Αναστασοπουλος - Ηλιας - 21 - _____

580 - Vasileios Anastasopoulos - Ilias - 21 - _____

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581 - Γιαννακης Κεκες - Βασιλειος - 24 - _____

581 - Giannakis Kekes - Vasileios - 24 - _____

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582 - Γεωργιος Κεκες - Βασιλειος - 22 - _____

582 - Georgios Kekes - Vasileios - 22 - _____

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583 - Γεωργιος Κεκε - Ιωαννης - 28 - _____

583 - Georgios Keke - Ioannis - 28 - _____

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584 - Γεωργιος Πολυχρονοπουλος - Αθανασιος - 27 - _____

584 - Georgios Polychronopoulos - Athanasios - 27 - _____

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585 - Γεωργιος Κεκες - Νικολαος - 42 - _____

585 - Georgios Kekes - Nikolaos - 42 - _____

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586 - Γεωργιος Γιαννακοπουλος - Γιαννακης - 52 - _____

586 - Georgios Giannakopoulos - Giannakis - 52 - _____

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587 - Γεωργιος Αναστασοπουλος - Αναστασιος - 32 - _____

587 - Georgios Anastasopoulos - Anastasios - 32 - _____

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588 - Γεωργιος Φουντας - Δρακος - 45 - _____

588 - Georgios Foundas - Drakos - 45 - _____

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589 - Δημητριος Πολυχρονοπουλος - Παναγιωτης - 28 - _____

589 - Dimitrios Polychronopoulos - Panagiotis - 28 - _____

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590 - Δημος Ταλαμανας - αναστος - 26 - _____

590 - Dimos Talamanas - Anastos - 26 - _____

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591 - Δημητριος Πολυχρονοπουλος - Πολυχρονης - 36 - _____

591 - Dimitrios Polychronopoulos - Polychronis - 36 - _____

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592 - Επαμινωωους Μιχος - Αποοτολος - 57 - _____

592 - Epaminooous Michos - Apostolos - 57 - _____

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593 - Ηλιας Καραμπετζος - Καλογερος - 30 - _____

593 - Ilias Karambetzos - Kalogeros - 30 - _____

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594 - Ηλιας Μιχος - Μιχος - 60 - _____

594 - Ilias Michos - Michos - 60 - _____

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595 - Ηλιας Αναστασοπουλος - Αναστασιος - 32 - _____

595 - Ilias Anastasopoulos - Anastasios - 32 - _____

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596 - Ιωαννης Γιαννακοπουλος - Γεωργιος - 22 - _____

596 - Ioannis Giannakopoulos - Georgios - 22 - _____

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597 - Ιωαννης Πολυχρονοπουλος - Πολυχρονης - 38 - _____

597 - Ioannis Polychronopoulos - Polychronis - 38 - _____

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598 - Κωνσταντινος Κορελας - Πουλος - 26 - _____

598 - Konstandinos Korelas - Poulos - 26 - _____

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599 - Καλογηρος Καραμπετζος - Ηλιας - 46 - _____

599 - Kalogiros Karambetzos - Ilias - 46 - _____

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600 - Κωνσταντινος Φουντας - Δρακος - 44 - _____

600 - Konstandinos Foundas - Drakos - 44 - _____

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601 - Νικολαος Παναγοπουλος - Αθανασιος - 27 - _____

601 - Nikolaos Panagopoulos - Auanasios - 27 - _____

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602 - Νικητας Ταλαμανας - Γιαννακης - 30 - γεωργος - Παπατηρησεις

602 - Nikitas Talamanas - Giannakis - 30 - farmer - residing in Papatiriseis

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603 - Παναγιωτης Κεκες - Γιαννακης - 28 - γεωργος  

603 - Panagiotis Kekes - Giannakis - 28 - farmer

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604 - Παναγιωτης Γιαννακοπουλος - Γιαννακης - 45 - γεωργος

604 - Panagiotis Giannakopoulos - Giannakis - 45 - farmer

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605 - Παναγιωτης Μιχος - Αποστολης - 40 - γεωργος

605 - Panagiotis Michos - Apostolis - 40 - farmer

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606 - Σωτηρος Μιχος - Αποστολης - 30 - γεωργος

606 - Sotiros Michos - Apostolis - 30 - farmer

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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Anavryti, Peloponnese, Greece - Founded by Jews?



Thanks to John Vasilakos for posting this on Facebook.

The article titled THE BEAUTIFUL VILLAGE OF ANAVRYTI was published by the GreekNewsOnline.com on March 20, 2006.


Anavryti is a small beautiful village situated in the Greek region of Peloponnese, on a snowy area of Mt. Taygetos. . . . The article promotes tourism to the village.

There is a section of the piece that is titled FOUNDED BY JEWS?

In an article published in the Oxford Journals, John Launer writes the following about Anavryti:
“I found out that the legend of the Greek mountain Jews was not nearly as improbable as it seemed. Indeed, the Apocrypha records contacts between the Maccabeans and the Spartans that go back to the third century BC. Over a millennium later, there were Jews living in Sparta—although a monk named Nikon tried to have them expelled, in exchange for helping the inhabitants to overcome the plague. A Jewish quarter survived in Mystra itself after the Turkish conquest, only to be burned down later by the more brutal Venetians. Maybe the village of Anavriti had been founded by the survivors of one of these upheavals.
A few years passed before I found myself back in Mystra, this time accompanied by my wife. It was, of course, unthinkable to miss the chance of finally visiting Anavriti. Following local advice, we took a taxi from Mystra to a gravel mill in the countryside a few miles up the road, and asked someone there to show us the trail head. Rather untypically for Greece, the advice turned out to be entirely accurate and useful. Soon, we found ourselves climbing in glorious weather along a spectacular kalderini—an ancient cobbled donkey track that had borne Mycenaean traders across the mountains to the coast, hundreds of years even before Sparta was dreamed of, let alone Mystra. Two hours later, we reached Anavriti with a sense of triumph. We collapsed into a bar in the main street, and ordered some drinks in our minimal Greek. Having finally arrived here, how would we find out anything about the place or its history?
‘How ya doing?’ were the first words we heard. Evidently, we had no need to worry. An elderly man had sauntered over to our table, sat down, and begun to speak in perfect Brooklyn. Introducing himself as Louis (we never learned his Greek name) he explained that he was Anavritan, born and bred. Originally destined for a monastery, he had not found the idea much to his taste. Instead, he joined the Greek navy and ended up living in the USA for 45 years until he came back here to retire. When he was a child, he explained, there were 4200 inhabitants in Anavriti, including 400 schoolchildren. Nowadays, the population was made up largely of retired Greek Americans like himself—hence the wealthy-looking houses and renovated roofs we could see all around us. There were now only six children in the whole village, although they still employed a teacher to keep the school going.
Louis told us about his own family. We learned about his son, his Cuban daughter-in-law and his Spanish-speaking grandchildren. He described some of his chequered career in New York and Florida, which included an episode of smuggling diamonds from Ghana. Most people, on learning that my wife is a rabbi, are somewhat fazed at first. Not so Louis, who at one time had been in the catering business in New York. There, he had a male rabbi as a business partner, and had known many female rabbis as acquaintances. His company had catered for literally hundreds of large-scale bar mitzvahs. (‘They don’t do them now like the old days!’ he lamented.) He addressed my wife as ‘Rabbi’ at every turn. And then, suddenly, he cracked a Jewish joke and broke into Yiddish—the language of mediaeval Germany, carried into Poland and Russia by Jewish exiles, and then, half a millennium later, into America, to be picked up by every New Yorker of whatever origin.
Was Anavriti itself really Jewish, we asked him. Yes, he replied, that’s what the old people say. According to popular tradition, the village was founded by Jews around 500 AD. Later on everyone converted to orthodox Christianity, he said, but they were proud of their origins, and disappointed that the young people took no interest in the tradition. And yet, to tell the truth, I think we hardly cared very much ourselves by that moment who had founded Anavriti, or why. Sitting here, with the ironies and interconnections of a dozen civilizations echoing in our conversation and reverberating through the surrounding landscape, all that seemed to matter was the miracle of chance meetings and inexplicable coincidences, and the enduring beauty of Greece itself”.





Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Do you have Greek ancestors who were nomadic shepherds?



Do you have Greek ancestors who were nomadic shepherds?  

If you do, you will find the article SHEPHERDS, BRIGANDS, AND IRREGULARS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY GREECE very interesting.  It was written by John S. Koliopoulos and published in The Journal of the Hellenic Diaspora, No. 4, Pages 41-53, Winter 1981.

You can read the entire article by following the link in the paragraph above.  Below you will find a short excerpt - 

The real home for the pastoralist was the mountain, and the center of mainland Greek pastoralism was the Pindus mountain range, easily reached from the plains and valleys of Thessaly, Sterea Hellas (continental Greece), Epirus, and southern Macedonia. Mount Pindus and the adjacent mountains of southern Macedonia and Sterea Hellas, as well as the plains and coastal lowlands of Thessaly, Arta, Aitolia, Phthiotis, Katerini, and Thessaloniki, provided the suitable combination of summer and winter pastures for the flocks of sheep and goats of these pastoralists, who avoided the summer heat of the plain and the snows of the mountain and exploited the grasses of both highland and lowland. The pastoralists of central Greece, organized in large, patriarchal associations of men and their horses, sheep and goats, the tselingata,* ascended in May to the higher slopes of the mountain and descended in November to the lowlands. They shared the highlands with sedentary semi-nomadic communities, which, according to one theory, had been created or augmented by refugees from the plain who fled the hardships of Turkish conquest and rule.  The semi- and non-pastoralist mountaineers who had fled the Turks—and most probably malaria and the plague as well—had created a material civilization as impressive as it was precarious and fragile, an "accident," to borrow a fitting term from a prominent student of the Mediterranean world,' which perished under the impact of the Western European industrial revolution in the first few decades of the nineteenth century,' before the pastoralism of the same area felt the impact of related forces and factors. Pastoralist fortunes in the area increased in the first two decades of the nineteenth century, coinciding with the growth of Ali Pasha's economic and political power in the same area. It seems that, although individual shepherds suffered from the exactions of the rapacious pasha, his policies generally favored nomadic and transhumant pastoralism. The steady extension of Ali's personal landed property, as well as that of his sons, to the detriment of the free peasant's land, favored the growth of flocks of sheep and goats because it created out of the small peasant landstrips large land estates which provided the necessary winter pastures for the animals. The conversion of the free villages (eleftherochoria) of the lowlands into large estates (fiftliks) was practiced extensively and with unvarying success: the unfortunate peasants were forced by the tyrannical pasha, who was also the collector of the tithes and their creditor, to become his metayers or to abandon the village and seek better tenancy terms elsewhere; the same fate awaited those who remained, as they were obliged to shoulder the tax obligations of the entire village. Sometimes the plague decimated the population of a village, with the same effect on the status of the remaining inhabitants. Domeniko and Vlachoyanni and a score of other Thessalian villages had been recently converted into Ali Pasha's fiftdiks when they were visited by a foreign traveler in the early nineteenth century.' Out of the 72 villages of Velestino district (Thessaly), only 12 were still inhabited around the same time; the rest had declined and become miserable hamlets.° 



Sunday, March 15, 2015

105,310 born in Greece - New York Census Records 1850-1940



FamilySearch.org has FREE databases that will allow you to view census forms for people listed as being born in Greece and residing in New York State.

LINK TO 105,310 RECORDS

Includes the following record sets:

United States Census, 1850 
United States Census, 1860
United States Census, 1870
United States Census, 1880
New York State Census, 1892
United States Census, 1900
New York State Census, 1905
United States Census, 1910
United States Census, 1920
United States Census, 1930
United States Census of Merchant Seamen, 1930
United States Census, 1940

Each year the census form is different and FamilySearch.org does a great job of providing information for each year.  (Click on a name and then follow the link on the right hand side titled "About this collection".)



Saturday, March 14, 2015

HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF CRETE, General State Archives of Greece (GAK)





Links to the HISTORICAL ARCHIVES OF CRETE, General State Archives of Greece (GAK)


You will be able to read about the history of the archives in Crete, contact and location information and a description of the archives and collections.  I have duplicated the portion describing the archives and collections below:

The archives of the Historical Archive of Crete covering all Crete (hence the name of the Service), estimated at about 700,000 extremely important documents and other documents, from 1821 until today. The material is sorted and recorded in material books, cards, catalogs and special indexes. In more than 170 archival collections of the Service, including:
- Archives of Cretan Revolutions - official correspondence 1821 - 1830, 1866 -1869, 1877-1878, 1895-1898, and the Movement Therisso 1905.
- Private archival collections relating to various periods of Cretan history, correspondence with the Chiefs of the Revolutions, Somatarchon, chieftains and other prominent persons (Praktikidi, Manousogiannaki, Tsouderon, P. Koronaiou, Hadji Michael Giannari Partheniou Kelaidi, Halidon A . Giannari Jn. Zymbrakakis, P. and A. Kriari, Kalaisaki, Isychaki, P. Giparis, N. and A. Skoula, I. Paizi, Michelogianni, etc.).
- Cretan Archive Fighters (registered in indexes and specific subfolders, all the fighters of the Cretan Revolutions of 1866 and until 1898, with biographical information, proof of military instruments [kapetanochartia], and their requests for pensions, which refers the action).
- Ottoman Archives and the Central Translation Office of Crete.
- Archives Notary from the late 19th century onwards.
- Archives Legal, Court of Appeal of Crete and Chania Court dating from the last century onwards.
- The entire record of the Cretan State, autonomic ie Cretan State (1898-1913). This is a very long file documents for senior management (ministries) of the Cretan State.
- Archival material referred to in the Second World War included five collections that give valuable information for both the Battle of Crete and for the Resistance of the Cretan people but also for the administrative situation on the island during this period.
- City schools and Archives of Chania.
- Latest records, public and private: Prefectures files, various public services, education, various other organizations and individuals, etc.