Thursday, August 31, 2017

577 interments - Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cemetery Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - Headstone Photographs




FIND A GRAVE has 70% of the 577 headstones at the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cemetery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania photographed and documented online with birth, death dates, and sometimes a copy of the death certificate or other documents.  You can view them for FREE online.

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church members have sponsored a Veterans War Memorial at the cemetery that has names engraved on it.  This will be covered in a separate post.
.
The following surnames are included in the database for Holy Trinity:


Alexander
Alexandropoulos
Alexiades
Alexopulos
Allen
Amentas
Amplas
Amurgis
Andon
Andromalos
Anestis
Angelou
Arvanitas
Athas
Backeris
Balitsaris
Balouris
Barboutis
Beckas
Berakis
Bilo
Bistolas
Bolaris
Bourgos
Bouris
Bridoux
Butterini
Cambanis
Candis
Carles
Chaconas
Chaconas
Chapacharis
Chapas
Chellos
Cherpes
Chrissafis
Chrissis
Christ
Clay
Clayton
Cocheres
Colikas
Condos
Constantine
Contaridis
Contis
Contos
Copetas
Costulis
Coumos
Datson
Damolis
Danas
Daniels
Danis
Demas
Demopoulos
Demos
DeMoss
Dessos
Dimas
Economidas
Elefteriou
Ellin
Evans
Fakles
Fekete
Fellis
Ferrari
Festas
Fiffas
Florent
Fortes
Frankos
Gandis
Geanopoulos
Geanopulos
George
Georges
Georgiades
Georgiakakos
Georguleas
Germanos
Gianakos
Giannakos
Giannoutsos (Lemberopoulos)
Goulakos
Graffakos
Grafiadis
Grivas
Hairdis
Haniotakis (Venizelos)
Haralm
Hartig
Hillery
Hulse
Johnstone
Kainarol
Kakaroumbas
Kakouros
Kalantonis
Kalaris
Kallams
Kalogerakos
Kalyvas
Kamitses
Kamitsi
Kapranis (Lambrous)
Karadakis
Karambelas
Karamouzis
Karas
Karavolos
Karellas
Karidis
Karis
Karles
Karras
Kastanis
Katevanakis
Katsampis
Kavoulakis
Keffalas
Kelly
Kintgios
Kiratzis
Klappas
Kokinakis
Kokotsis
Komninos
Koncoletos
Korones
Kosanovich
Kosmakos
Kostante
Kostas
Kostopolos
Kotsifakou
Koumouteakoe
Koumulis
Kourakos
Krist
Kyriazis
Ladakos
Lakes
Lakos
Lalikos
Lambrinos
Lamprinakos
Lasher (Bonaros)
Lazakis
Learos
Lemberopoulos
Leoleos
Levendos
Limberis
Lozos
Lucas
Mackris
Makris
Malamos
Manesiotis
Manganiotis
Manias
Manolakakis
Manolis
Maragos
Maraiades
Mariades
Markakis
Markenzin
Mason
McGlumphy (Lalikos)
Merodis
Mihalonoulos
Mihalopoulos
Mihaloupoulos
Mires
Mitaras (Condos)
Mitchell
Mitseas
Moisakis
Morris
Moshas
Moshidis
Mourtakos
Murtakos
Nicholas
Nichols
Nicopulos
Nikolas
Nikolopulos
Paganis
Panacas
Panagakis
Panagiotis
Panagiotou
Pandelis
Pantages
Pantzis
Papadakis
Papoutsis
Pappadimitropoulos
Pappadimitropoulou
Pappas
Paras
Parikakis
Paterakas
Paterakis
Patridis
Patrinos
Patsalos
Paxinos
Pefanis (Ferendinos)
Perros
Peterson
Petredis
Petropoulos
Phaturos
Politis
Politos
Pollick
Pontikos
Pothos
Poulos
Pournaras
Poymnakhe
Rameas
Rassias (Gaus)
Regakis
Rentzeperes
Retetagos
Reynolds
Rigas
Roman
Romanias
Roomeliotis
Rozakis
Russell
Sabol (Sadvary)
Sacoulas (Gliptis)
Salantis
Sarandou
Saravanos
Savouras
Scopelitis
Scott
Scoulos
Scoutelis
Scutelis
Selevos
Sergakis
Sigalias
Skentzos
Soldatos
Sotos
Spanos
Starr
Statheas
Stavros (Florent)
Tanner
Tasopoulos
Tassos
Theodore
Thiodor
Titonis
Triantafilos
Tsakonas
Tsakos
Tsaktanis
Tsambarlis
Tsatsakis
Tzanakos
Valas
Valliant
Vasilatos
Vlahikas
Vlahos
Vlogiannitys
Voultepsis
Voutyras
Welsh
Woodworth
Xipolitakis
Ydreos
Zafiris
Zagnacky
Zakiniliynakis
Zappas
Zissis









Tuesday, August 29, 2017

221 interments - Greek Cemetery, Galveston, Texas - Headstone Photographs



FIND A GRAVE has 97% of the 221 headstones at the Greek Orthodox Cemetery in Galveston, Texas photographed and documented online with birth, death dates, and sometimes a copy of the death certificate.  You can view them for FREE 
.
The following surnames are included:

Agalou
Agorastos
Alexander
Anastassiou
Anderson
Andreadelis
Andrechakou
Andronis
Anthony
Aranges
Argelos
Aslanides
Athanasiou
Basiardanes
Bell
Bogazis
Bravos
Canell (Kanellakouelos)
Caravageli
Caros
Carter
Chiomes
Christian
Christos
Cokins
Constantine
Counnis
Couvaras
Debanlis
Demetrie
Demos
Demostenes
Dimitri
Dokos
Douvry
Drevas
Economides
Economidy
Fontoukos
Fox
Frangelis
Frangos
Garris
Gavrel
George
Gulis
Halvas
Homer
Hornuff
James
Karlabas
Kazas
Kouzens
Laros
Liberty
Liolu
Loomis
Lukas
Lymberis
Makres
Manetas
Manoussos
Marcogenis
Marinos
Mavreas
McDowell
Menehll
Metsikas
Miller
Mitchell
Nakis
Nelson
Nicholis
Nichols
Nikolaidou
Pamukis
Papadopolou
Papavasiliou
Pappas
Paul
Phillips
Pousos
Poulakis
Poulos
Praides
Pratley
Radovich
Redmon
Revera
Roumelos
Rousos
Rozos
Safos
Santire
Sevdalis
Sideris
Sidiropoulos
Sotirelis
Stamoulis
Stathakos
Stavros
Tefas
Thanos
Theofilakos
Vogelpohl (Konugres)
Waterman
Wittliff
Zgourides
Zografos




Cemeteries of St. John Church in Pueblo, Colorado



CEMETERIES OF ST. JOHN CHURCH
IN PUEBLO, COLORADO

by Antonis H. Diamataris

Published in The National Herald, February 9, 2007 Issue

------------------------------

I am excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 

------------------------------

Beginning in the 1880*s, just as Greektowns were being established all across North America, the new immigrants also immediately sought out graveyards. Upon reflection, the fact that Greeks collectively purchased entire blocks of cemetery sites, often long before churches were physically built, should come as no surprise. Life in the ksentia was long understood to be dangerous, and by the standards of the day, Ameriki was especially so.

While it is fairly easy to learn about the histories of Greektowns all across North America, locating documentation on the history of Greek American graveyards is more difficult to systematically acquire. That's why we need to pay more attention to grave sites, especially with the shrinking of the Greek American community and the closing of parishes all across the country, particularly in the American West.

The historic Saint John the Baptist Greek Orthodox community of Pueblo, Colorado recently observed its 100th anniversary. Greeks began arriving in Colorado in the 1880's to labor in the mines, work as smelters, and to help build the ever-expanding railroads. The Sante Fe and the Missouri Pacific railroads both had section gangs of Greeks who would winter in Pueblo. The Greek settlement in Pueblo was due principally to Minnequa Metal Works (later the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company), which soon became the largest complex of smelters west of the Mississippi. By 1903, the claim was made that 1,500 Greeks lived and worked year-round in Pueblo, with another 1,500 or more who would winter there when the mines and the railroads closed down for the season.

Saint John the Baptist parish first opened its doors in 1907. As news of the new church spread among Greeks in the West, the regularly attending communicants of Saint John's Sunday and holiday services soon began to arrive from hamlets, small towns and cities located just south of Denver all the way to Taos, New Mexico. Individual Greeks, as well as entire families, traveled from as far east as Garden City, Kansas. The western boundaries of Saint John parishioners extended to Grand Junction, Colorado.

Over the course of 100 years, this unique geographic dispersal eventually led to the situation where the majority of parishioners no longer hail exclusively from the city of Pueblo itself. As documents, community memories and present circumstances all report, Saint John's Church in Pueblo has always been a multi-community parish. A partial list of these other locations for regularly attending parishioners includes (but was not limited to) Alamosa, Aspen, Canon City, Colorado Springs, Grand Junction, La Junta, Lamar, Leadville, Salida, Trinidad and Walsenburg, Colorado; Garden City, Kansas; Questa and Raton, New Mexico; and a host of other small towns in the region. So those with memories of the Greek community in Pueblo, and who regularly attended church services there, have never all been exclusively from that city.

This unique situation resulted in the Pueblo parish drawing its congregation from roughly 87,000 square miles. Due to the wide geographic dispersal of its parishioners, Saint John's Church unintentionally became, strictly in terms of geographic dispersal, the largest Greek Orthodox community in the country, and its multi-community base has never fundamentally changed. This parish has never moved from its original location, and has the distinction of being the oldest Greek Orthodox community to continuously observe services in the same edifice west of the Mississippi.

THE PARISH GRAVEYARDS
The immigrant founders of the Pueblo parish were men who faced the daily realities of hard work and life head-on. All available documents and most community memories agree. The foundation of church and the establishment of a cemetery were simultaneous. The first article of the parish constitution, based on a longstanding oral tradition, was finally put into print by the 1920's.  As, the Greek people of Pueblo, having come together, formed a community under the name, Greek Orthodox Community of Colorado in Pueblo, whose purpose will be the erection of a church, the purchase of a cemetery, and the maintenance of them both.  Nothing could be clearer.


Hard-pressed by grueling physical labor, these men were under no illusions. Directly involved in the industrialization of the American West, these Greek laborers, by firsthand experience, had to live with the appalling work conditions of the smelters, mines and railroad gangs every day. Company doctors were to be avoided at all costs, as they were paid a set fee for amputating limbs rather than healing injured men.

Living harshly frugal lives, these early Greek pioneers sent the vast majority of their wages home. Seeing fellow workers die or immigrants being abused or severely harassed for no reason by "native-born" Americans, these Greek laborers quickly realized what options were open to them. They knew very well that life changes with every breath. The harsh reality of daily life naturally linked the needs of both the living and dead.

Just as in other areas of community life, in matters of the dead, the Pueblo parish has never simply served a congregation based solely in the city of Pueblo. Gravesites in La Junta, Trinidad, Salida, Rocky Forge, Canon City and elsewhere in southern Colorado are as fundamentally part of this Greek community as any found in the city of Pueblo's own Roselawn Cemetery. Ongoing efforts by the Saint John's parish council are directed to literally locating and identifying all known Greek gravesites throughout Colorado.

ROSELAWN CEMETERY
Having recognized the church's multi-community base, even in terms of cemeteries, within the city of Pueblo, the very first church committee purchased burial plots in Roselawn. Greek graves can be found there in Sections 18, 23 and 68. Section 23, between Circle and Lilac Avenues, holds some of the earliest Greek graves, and is especially representative of the early community. Reflecting the history and demographic size of the Saint John community today, more than 260 Greek graves can be found in throughout Roselawn Cemetery.


The uniqueness of the St. John the Baptist parish does not simply end with its historic church structure. The Greek American community is only just starting to become aware of the manner in which historical landmarks directly shape their collective history. Cemeteries, as part of the general impact of Greeks on the American landscape, have seen increasing attention in the Greek American press.

"Gone But Not Forgotten: A Definitive History of the Greek Section at Woodlawn Cemetery"  by Nicholas M. Prevas, for example, deals with the origins and subsequent events surrounding the acquisition of cemetery lots for the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation in Baltimore (Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation, Baltimore: 2001). The enduring contributions evident within Mr. Prevas' book will unquestionably stand the test of time.


The significance of this study extends well beyond Baltimore, given that 90 years have passed since the Annunciation parishioners decided to establish a cemetery.

As Mr. Prevas notes at the very beginning of this volume, to secure a cemetery for the Orthodox faithful of Baltimore, only three short years after incorporating with a charter, is noteworthy for various reasons. A church cemetery was not typical for the Greek immigrant colonies in America. It illustrates the progressive thinking of the early parish leaders. And most importantly, it helped solidify the decision that Baltimore, for the majority of parishioners, was to be their new permanent home.

Having said that, the St. John's community of Pueblo had already made provisions for providing for the death of community members, first in 1903 and then within their first incorporation papers of 1905, cemetery lots were purchased. No matter how one cares to date the beginning of Saint John's parish in Pueblo, efforts at securing cemetery lots predates the Baltimore parish by more than four years.

1ST FUNERAL PHOTOGRAPHS
The first photographs shown anyone inquiring about the history of SAINT John's Church are those from what can only be called "death photographs".  Studio photographers were hired to take a posed 8.5×10 black-and-white photograph for each early funeral. Always taken in front of the church, these photographs, over time, developed a standardized pose. A Greek immigrant man in an open coffin is at the center, and around him, the mourners are gathered, as the priest stands behind the deceased.


Few women are seen in any of these early photographs. This absence underscores the very early nature of these images, as it emphasizes the large number of bachelors in Pueblo's Greek community. Occasionally, one will see men with musical instruments in these early photographs, as well. Their presence bespeaks of an older, now abandoned, funeral custom wherein musicians would lead the funeral to the graveyard, playing as they led the procession.


As community memories recall, following the centuries-old folk customs of rural Greece, many of these men were buried by their compatriots as if they were bridegrooms. The deceased was dressed in the best suit available, a wedding crown on his head, a ring on his right hand, and a sprig of basil on his lapel. Not infrequently, even a small amulet of Greek soil was draped around the bridegroom*#8217;s neck. Having failed (however unwittingly) to fulfill their societal roles as men, those who died unmarried were said to be wedded to death.

In George Drosinis (1859-1951) poem, The Soil of Greece, we hear of these earthly amulets: I will hang you as an amulet on my breast/and when my heart wears you as an amulet she will take courage/be helped by you/and will not be bewitched by other foreign beauties/Your grace will give me strength/Wherever I turn, wherever I stand/You will kindle in me only one desire: to return to Greece.

As with other communities of Greeks, during this same time period, the Greeks of Pueblo insisted on these quite expensive photographs, so that they would serve as evidence to the family back in Greece that their lost loved ones had received a proper Greek Orthodox funeral.

Ongoing concern for these men continues to be demonstrated in a touching manner. Nearly every visitor who demonstrates an interest in the history of Saint John the Baptist Church in Pueblo is shown several of these photographs, which are kept with the church's records.

Unfortunately, the names of many of the earliest pioneers have been lost over time. These photographs are brought out, and the visitor is asked if they can identify anyone in the photograph. Deep respect for these men overrides any embarrassment. A keen sense that no one in the Saint John's community is ever to be forgotten is at the heart of every such request for further information.

Note:  There is a note at the bottom of the article referencing Steve Frangos as someone who could be contacted for further information.  




Thursday, August 24, 2017

Sephardic Judaism's Hidden Children in Occupied Greece


SEPHARDIC JUDAISM'S HIDDEN CHILDREN 
IN OCCUPIED GREECE

by Alexios Nicholaos Menexiadis

Published in The National Herald, February 4, 2006 Issue

------------------------------

I am excited to announce that The National Herald has given Hellenic Genealogy Geek the right to reprint articles that may be of interest to our group. 

------------------------------


-----------------------


There are many similarities between the history, sufferings and fate of the Jews who were living in Greece during the Second World War and the Occupation, and those of the same fate in other German-occupied territories, but there are also many differences. 

Extensive investigation has been going on for some years now into the tragic story of the Jews of that time, as part of international historical research into the Holocaust. Greek historians and researchers have written noteworthy and particularly interesting works documenting events, accounts and memories which should never be forgotten, and have made them accessible to the general public. 

The focus of most of these works has been on the arrest, uprooting and eventual extermination of thousands of Greek Jews at Nazi concentration camps. The participation of many escapees in the resistance movement, and the efforts made by ordinary people, local political, law enforcement and religious authorities to save those who were of the Jewish faith are quite well documented in historical works of a purely scientific nature, as well as published accounts of personal experiences.

The disintegration of the communities; the systematic plundering of synagogues; and the seizure of the property of displaced Jews are all issues which have already been dealt with and researched to a greater or lesser degree.


There is another aspect, however: that of the ordinary people who, with no personal interest, protected the fugitives when they were at the utmost limits of despair and had no means of defending themselves against the merciless persecution the occupying forces had unleashed upon them. 

Not only individuals, but also whole families frequently found refuge in the homes of their Christian fellow citizens. Hidden this way, they managed to survive in most cases. The people who hid them were ordinary people with nothing to gain - indeed, quite the contrary. They not only placed themselves, but also their families, in tremendous danger. If they were found out, they faced capital punishment, as stipulated in the German regulations. 

And yet, these people - more often than not acting on their own initiative and not waiting to be asked - offered to help their fellow human beings whose lives were in danger, people with whom they had lived peacefully for many years. They shared the meager space of their homes with them and, in many cases, also shared their even more meager food supplies. Putting their own lives in jeopardy at a time when the hardships and horrors of everyday life were already tremendous, they showed that compassion and sensitivity to others' pain and suffering are human values which are able to withstand the most adverse of conditions. 

Even in this day and age, when the absence of such values is considered commonplace, we can not help but be moved by this fact and filled with optimism about human nature. 

After the war, usually at the instigation of those who had been saved, the efforts and altruism of most of these people was officially recognized by the state of Israel, and they were awarded the title of “Righteous Among Nations” by the Yad-Vashem Institution. The sequence of events of that time is more or less familiar. The Greek-Italian War of 1940-41 was succeeded on April 6 by the German invasion. By April 9, the Germans had already entered Thessaloniki. On the 27th, they arrived in Athens, and the occupation of the whole of Greece was effected with the Battle of Crete, which lasted from May 20 to June 1.

SYSTEMATICALLY PLUNDERED 

Thessaloniki, home of the largest Jewish community in Greece, became German-occupied territory right away. That is where the first systematic persecution of Greek Jews began, when all male members of the Community were gathered together and humiliated in Plateia Eleftherias (Liberty Square) on July 11, 1942. Forced labor was imposed upon them, and a little later, they were confined to ghettos. Their property was systematically plundered. The culmination came in 1943, with the dispatches by rail under the most appalling conditions. Ninety-seven percent of the city's Jews never came back from the extermination camps. Only a few had foreseen the evil which was in store and managed to hide in time and save themselves. 

The Athens area was under Italian administration until September of the same year. Anti-Semitic laws did not apply here; so many Jews from the German-occupied parts of the country were able to find temporary refuge there, hoping it would be impossible to trace them in the densely populated city. However, when Italy capitulated and the Bandoglio government was formed, the Germans took over the former Italian-administered territory and set about their monstrous task there, too, with nothing and no one to stand in their way. The difference, however, was that, to a greater or lesser degree, the Jews in Athens had advance information about the fate of others of their faith and, at lease those with enough prudence, took steps to hide. There were many cases of Christians who willingly helped their persecuted fellow human beings. 



Unfortunately, as in so many other cases, it is no longer possible to interview many of these people and record what their motives had been, and what prompted them to make such difficult and astoundingly dangerous decisions. They were already adults at that time, and after so many years, most of them are no longer with us. 

Great as a disappointment the loss of their personal accounts may be, as they would most certainly have been of exceptional interest, so much the greater is the need to keep the memory of these events alive through the personal accounts of those who benefited from their unfolding before them as spectators whose powers of observation were not affected by worries, anxious calculations, and their parents' struggle to save the family now makes it possible for us to record a sizeable and interesting part of the history of those difficult times. 

The research conducted for the purpose of this exhibition harbors no pretensions of being a complete and systematic scientific study. It is based on interviews and written accounts, and is more like the children's own direct, living record of their experiences and memories of the time they were hunted and in hiding. The aim was to present these accounts and make them known to a wider audience, one which reaches beyond the community of those who have made history their profession. 

Attention should be drawn to the particularly intense emotional expression, which these experiences characteristically have the power to provoke, even now. In many cases, the people giving the interviews were unable to hold back their tears. The anxiety over survival, which parents transmitted to their children during their struggle to stay alive, is one of the most noticeable features of these accounts. The same could be said of feelings of loneliness and separation from loved ones when concerns over safety drove families to split up and hide in separate hiding places. 

It was, of course, far from easy for children between the ages of three and sixteen to be so abruptly separated from their loved ones for months on end. Feelings of loss, and in some cases rejection, even if unfounded, gripped their innocent souls. The constant need to play a role, which was necessary for their survival, coupled with sudden separation from their real parents and long periods of time spent with strangers, towards whom they had to behave as they would to their parents, frequently led to confusion, which in many cases went on after the occupation was over. 

Another feature of the accounts is the strong expressions of gratitude the now adult hidden children of the time feel towards their saviors. This is true even when the saviors are not known or contact has not been maintained. Indeed, it is usually following the initiative of those who were saved that YadVashem awards the saviors. But the overriding emotion running through almost every single account is fear: fear of everything and everybody which could betray the children themselves or their families. It was the fear of even pronouncing their own names, which was not overcome for a long time after the liberation and which, in many cases, left indelible marks on their personalities, and even on their whole adult lives. 

Note:  Mr. Menexiadis was a doctoral candidate in History at the University of Athens in 2006



Wednesday, August 23, 2017

1871 - Village of NEOCHORION, Municipality of Karyoupoleos, Region of Gythio, Greece - FREE Translation of 1871 General Election List


The digital collections of the Greek State Archives offer a wealth of information to those of us interested in Greek genealogy.  As part of their online collection is the "Election Material From the Collection of Vlachoyiannis" .  This includes "General Election Lists" for each Municipality; recorded by community (city, village, settlement, etc.).

You can view a scanned copy of each list, printed in the Greek language.  This is a GREAT resource, but very difficult to navigate for those who do not read Greek.  Each row includes:  Line # -  Given Name, Surname - Father's Name -  Age - Occupation.

I have translated these pages and made them available in both Greek and English, doing my best to transcribe the information accurately.  I would always recommend viewing the original scanned copies (link below).  

- To the best of my knowledge, these lists include all Males who were eligible to vote in the elections.  

- Names are in alphabetical order by Given name (First name), many times recorded as an abbreviaton.  Example:  Panag = Panagiotis.

- Since the names are in order by Given name you will have to look at the entire community to find multiple members of the family in the same village.  Many times a father is still alive and you will be able to find him in these electoral lists.  This can help advance you family history research back to the early 1800's.  Example:  Year of Election List is 1872.  Father's age is 65.  Birth year would be calculated as 1807.

-----
If you wish to share any of the translated information, please give appropriate credit and reference Hellenic Genealogy Geek at http://www.hellenicgenealogygeek.com along with my name (Georgia Stryker Keilman).  Thanks so much.
-----


VILLAGE OF NEOCHORION
in the
Municipality of Karyoupoleos

For your further reference, 
below is the Greek link to the online copies of the 
1871 Greek Electoral Rolls for this community

Line # - Given Name - Surname - Father's Name - Age - Occupation

451 – Αθαν ΚαπαρελακοςΓεωργιος – 28 – γεωργος

451 – Athan Kaparelakos – Georgios – 28 - farmer

-----

452 – Αναγν Χαντζιγιαννης – Ιερευς – 45 – γεωργος

452 – Anagn Chantzigiannis – Priest – 45 - farmer

-----

453 – Αναστ ?ιατοφυλακος – Αντωτιος – 33 - γεωργος

453 – Anast ?iatofylakos – Antotios – 33 - farmer

-----

454 – Αντων Α?απακος – Παναγιωτης – 27 – γεωργος

454 Anton A?apakosPanagiotis – 27 - farmer

-----

455 – Αντων Διπλαρακος – Παναγιωτης – 41 – γεωργος

455 – Anton DiplarakosPanagiotis – 41 - farmer

-----

456 – Αποστολ Ξεταπυδακος – Ηλιας – 42 – γεωργος

456 – Apostol Xetarydakos – Ilias – 42 - farmer

-----

457 – Αγησιλ Γουργουσης – Βασιλειος – 23 – γεωργος

457 – Agisil GourgousisVasileios – 23 - farmer

-----

458 – Αντων Καπουρελακος – Γεωργιος – 23 – γεωργος

458 – Anton KapourelakosGeorgios – 23 - farmer

-----

459 – Βασιλ Γουργουσης – Ιωαννης – 51 – στρατωτης

459 – Vasil GourgousisIoannis – 51 - army

-----

460 – Βασιλ Ζευγολατακος – Νικολαος – 23 – γεωργος

460 – Vasil Zevgolatakos – Nikolaos – 23 - farmer

-----

461 – Βασιλ Πιερατσακος – Γεωργιος – 25 – γεωργος

461 – Vasil PieratsakosGeorgios – 25 - farmer

-----

462 – Γεωρ Μανιατακος – Δημητριος – 42 – γεωργος

462 – Geor ManiatakosDimitrios – 42 - farmer

-----

463 – Γεωρ διπλασακος – Παναγιωτης – 32 ? – γεωργος

463 – Geor Diplasakos – Panagiotis – 32 ? - farmer

-----

464 – Γεωρ Αναστασακος – Αναστασιος – 30 – γεωργος

464 – Geor Anastasakos – Anastasios – 30 - farmer

-----

465 – Γεωρ Κουλαφακος – παναγωτης – 37 – γεωργος

465 – Geor KoulafakosPanagotis – 37 - farmer

-----

466 – γεωρ Ζευγoλατακος – Ιωαννης – 33 – γεωργος

466 – Geor ZevgolatakosIoannis – 33 - farmer

-----

467 – Γεωργ Αρηφακος – Γεωργιος – 32 – γεωργος

467 – Georg Arifakos – Georgios – 32 - farmer

-----

468 – Γεωρ Θεοδωρακος – Θεοδωρος – 59 – γεωργος

468 – Geor Theodorakos – Theodoros – 59 - farmer

-----

469 – Γεωρ Κακακος – Νικολαος – 23 – γεωργος

469 – Geor KakakosNikolaos – 23 - farmer

-----

470 – Γεωρ Κασακος – Νικολαος – 26 – γεωργος

470 – Geor Kasakos – Nikolaos – 26 - farmer

-----

471 – Γεωρ Διπλα?ακος – Παναγιωτης – 21 – γεωργος

471 – Geor Dipla?akos – Panagiotis – 21 - farmer

-----

472 – Δημητ Τσιλιβακος – Ιωαννης – 55 – γεωργος

472 – Dimit TsilivakosIoannis – 55 - farmer

-----

473 – Δημητ Ζευγαλατακος – Πιερος – 34 – γεωργος

473 – Dimit Zevgalatakos Pieros – 34 - farmer

-----

474 – Δημητ Καταβελακος – Λαμπρος – 27 – γεωργος

474 – Dimit Katavelakos Lambros – 27 - farmer

Note:  Father’s name was spelled Λαπμρος (Lapmros) on original records, I changed it in translation
-----

475 – δημητ ΚαπαρελακοςΓεωργιος – 26 – γεωργος

475 – Dimit Kaparelakos – Georgios – 26 - farmer

-----

476 – Διονυσιος Αναστασακος – Αναστισιος – 33 – κτηματιας

476 – Dionysios Anastasakos – Anastisios – 33 - landowner

-----

477 – Δημητ Μαντακος – Πετρος – 24 – γεωργος

477 – Dimit Mandakos Petros – 24 - farmer

-----

478 – Ηλιας Κασακος – Νικολαος – 21 – γεωργος

478 – Ilias Kasakos – Nikolaos – 21 – farmer

-----

479 – Η. Κασακος – Μιχαηλ – 27 – δημοδηδασκαλος

479 – I. Kasakos – Michail – 27 – school teacher

-----

480 – Ιωα. Οικονομακος – Παναγιωτης – 33 – γεωργος

480 – Ioa. Ekonomakos – Panagiotis – 33 - farmer

-----

481 – Ιωαν Γουργουρης ? – Παναγιωτης – 52 – γεωργος

481 – Ioan Gourgouris ? – Panagiotis – 52 - farmer

-----

482 – Ιωαν Καταβελακος – Λαμπρος – 29 – γεωργος

482 – Ioan Katavelakos – Lambros – 29 - farmer

----- 

483 – Ιωαν Γεωργακακος – γεωργιος – 47 – γεωργος

483 – Ioan Georgakakos – Georgios – 47 - farmer

-----

484 – Ιωαν Μαρτακακος – Δημητριος – 28 – γεωργος

484 – Ioan Martakakos – Dimitrios – 28 - farmer

-----

485 – Ιωαν Γιαννουλακος – Νικολαος – 69 – κτηματιας

485 – Ioan Giannoulakos Nikolaos – 69 - landowner

-----

486 – Ιωαν Ζευγολατακος – Δημητριος – 58 – κτηματιας

486 – Ioan Zevgolatakos Dimitrios – 58 - landowner

-----

487 – Ιωαν πιερουζακος – σπυρος – 25 – γεωργος

487 – Ioan Pierouzakos Spyros – 25 - farmer

-----

488 – Λαμπρος Καταβαλακος – Ευστρατιος – 64 – γεωργος

488 – Lambros Katavalakos – Efstratios – 64 - farmer

-----

489 – Μιχαηλ Κατζιρακος – Νικολαος – 37 – γεωργος

489 – Michael Katzirakos – Nikolaos – 37 - farmer

-----

490 – Μιχαηλ Γιαννουλακος – Ιωαννης – 32 – γεωργος

490 – Michail Giannoulakos – Ioannis – 32 - farmer

-----

491 – Μιχαηλ Ζευγολατακος – Πιερος – 27 – γεωργος

491 – Michail Zevgolatakos Pieros – 27 - farmer

-----

492 – Νικολ Γιαννουλακος – Ιωαννης – 32 – γεωργος

492 – Nikol Giannoulakos – Ioannis – 32 - farmer

-----

493 – Νικολ Λουμακος – Πιερος – 31 – γεωργος

493 – Nikol Loumakos – Pieros – 31 - farmer

-----

494 – Νικολ Διπλασακος – Παναγιωτης – 30 – γεωργος

494 – Nikol Diplasakos ? – Panagiotis – 30 - farmer

-----

495 – Νικολ Ζευγολατακος – Ιωαννης – 39 – γεωργος

495 – Nikol Zevgolatakos – Ioannis – 39 - farmer

-----

496 – Παναγ Πιερουζακος – Γεωργιος – 26 – γεωργος

496 – Panag Pierouzakos – Georgios – 26 - farmer

-----

497 – Παναγ Αναστασακος – Αναστασιος – 27 – γεωργος

497 – Panag Anastasakos – Anastasios – 27 - farmer

-----

498 – Παναγ Καββαλακος – Κωνσταντης – 27 – γεωργος

498 – Panag Kavvalakos – Konstandis – 27 - farmer

-----

499 – Παναγ Ζευγολατακος – Πιερος – 22 – γεωργος

499 – Panag Zevgolatakos - Pieros – 22 - farmer

-----

500 – παναγ Λεκακος – Γεωργιος – 23 - γεωργος

500 – Panag Lekakos – Georgios – 23 - farmer

-----

501 – παναγ Μανιατακος – Δημητριος – 47 – γεωργος

501 – Panag Maniatakos – Dimitrios – 47 - farmer

-----

502 -παναγ Τσιλιβακος – Δημητριος – 24 – γεωργος

502 – Panag Tsilivakos – Dimitrios – 24 - farmer

-----

503 – Πιερος Ζευγολατακος – Δημητριος – 23 – γεωργος

503 – Pieros Zevgolatakos – Dimitrios – 23 - farmer

-----

504 – Παναγ Ζευγολατακος – Νικολαος – 22 – γεωργος

504 – Panag Zevgolatakos – Nikolaos – 22 - farmer

-----

505 – Σαραντ Γιαννακος – Νικολαος – 22 – κτηματιας

505 – Sarant Giannakos Nikolaos – 22 - landowner

-----

506 – Σταυρος Φιλιππακος – Φιλιππος – 31 – γεωργος

506 – Stavros Filippakos – Filippos – 31 - farmer

-----

507 – στυλιαν Γιανουλακος – Ιωαννης – 27 – γεωργος

507 – Stylian Gianoulakos – Ioannis – 27 - farmer

-----

508 – στυλιαν Αποστολακος – Αποστολος – 35 – γεωργος

508 – Stylian Apostolakos Apostolos – 35 - farmer

-----

509 – Χρηστοφ πιερουτσακος – Γεωργιος – 23 - γεωργος

509 – Christof Pieroutsakos – Georgios – 23 - farmer